Health and Well-being of International University Students, and Comparison with Domestic Students in Tasmania Australia

Date

2018

Authors

Skromanis, Sarah
Cooling, Nick
Rodgers, Bryan
Purton, Terry
Fan, Frances
Bridgman, Heather
Harris, Keith
Presser, Jennifer
Mond, Jonathan

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

MDPI Publishing

Abstract

International students comprise an increasingly larger proportion of higher education students globally. Empirical evidence about the health and well-being of these students is, however, limited. We sought to examine the health and well-being of international students, primarily from Asian countries, attending the University of Tasmania, Australia, using domestic students as a comparison group. Ethics approval was given to invite (via email) all currently enrolled students to participate in the study by completing a pilot-tested, online survey. The survey was completed by 382 international students (response rate = 8.9%) and 1013 domestic students (9.2%). Independent samples t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-square tests were used for bivariate comparisons between international and domestic students, and between subgroups of international students. Regression models were used to examine the associations between student status (international vs. domestic) and health outcomes, controlling for demographic and enrolment variables. International students, particularly male students, were found to be at increased risk of several adverse health outcomes while also being less likely to seek help for mental health and related problems. The findings indicate the need for accessible, targeted, culturally-sensitive health promotion and early intervention programs.

Description

Keywords

international students, Australia, health and well-being, help-seeking

Citation

Source

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Type

Journal article

Book Title

Entity type

Access Statement

Open Access

License Rights

Creative Commons License (Attribution 4.0 International)

DOI

10.3390/ijerph15061147

Restricted until