ANU Open Research Repository has been upgraded. We are still working out a few issues, and there may be periodic outages throughout the day. Please get in touch with repository.admin@anu.edu.au if you experience any issues.
 

Procedural Rationality in Westminster Systems: HowDe‐SeparationAffects the Decision Premise

Date

2022-02-15

Authors

Dowding, Keith
Taflaga, Marija

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Wiley

Abstract

Westminster administrative systems were characterized by a clear separation between the political careers and roles of elected ministers and career civil servants. The former set the values or aims of the organization; the latter utilize those values when generating policy ideas. This separation provides what H.A. Simon calls “procedural rationality.” The decision premise of public servants is (1) an apolitical commitment to government service, and (2) a commitment to advise on and implement the current government values, including expert advice using their personal and institutional memory and procedural knowledge. Using evidence from Australia and the United Kingdom, we track the de-separation of political careers. Policy advice increasingly comes from outside the career public service, including politically appointed special advisors. Furthermore, senior politicians are increasingly drawn from the world of special and external advisors. De-separation changes the decision premise of all actors, which we argue deleteriously affects the nature of policy formation.

Description

Keywords

Citation

Source

Public Administration Review

Type

Journal article

Book Title

Entity type

Access Statement

License Rights

DOI

10.1111/puar.13459

Restricted until

2099-12-31