Burgeoning Indigenous land ownership: Diverse values and strategic potentialities

Date

2015

Authors

Altman, Jon
Markham, Francis

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

The Federation Press

Abstract

There have been two major tranches of Indigenous land rights reform in Australia since colonisation. The first, during the 1970s to 1990s, was based on broadly compensatory land rights regimes passed by Commonwealth and State governments. By 1992 about eight per cent of the Australian continent was held under some form of land rights regime; almost all this land was located in remote Northern Territory and South Australia. Other land rights regimes, with more limited geographic coverage, have been legislated in every Australian State or Territory except for Western Australia and the Australian Capital Territory. In the aftermath of Mabo v Queensland in 1992 and the passage of the Native Title Act 1993, a second tranche of Indigenous land repossession has unfolded. Both land rights and native title are ongoing processes.

Description

Keywords

Citation

Source

Type

Book chapter

Book Title

Native Title from Mabo to Akiba: A Vehicle for Change and Empowerment?

Entity type

Access Statement

License Rights

DOI

Restricted until

2037-12-31