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Self-Assembled Peptides: Characterisation and In Vivo Response

Date

2012-02-11

Authors

Nisbet, David R.
Williams, Richard J.

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Springer Verlag

Abstract

The fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds is a well-established field that has gained recent prominence for the in vivo repair of a variety of tissue types. Recently, increasing levels of sophistication have been engineered into adjuvant scaffolds facilitating the concomitant presentation of a variety of stimuli (both physical and biochemical) to create a range of favourable cellular microenvironments. It is here that self-assembling peptide scaffolds have shown considerable promise as functional biomaterials, as they are not only formed from peptides that are physiologically relevant, but through molecular recognition can offer synergy between the presentation of biochemical and physio-chemical cues. This is achieved through the utilisation of a unique, highly ordered, nano- to microscale 3-D morphology to deliver mechanical and topographical properties to improve, augment or replace physiological function. Here, we will review the structures and forces underpinning the formation of self-assembling scaffolds, and their application in vivo for a variety of tissue types.

Description

Keywords

biocompatible materials, cellular microenvironment, humans, nanostructures, peptides, tissue engineering, tissue scaffolds, protein multimerization

Citation

Source

Biointerphases

Type

Journal article

Book Title

Entity type

Access Statement

License Rights

DOI

10.1007/s13758-011-0002-x

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