The Gentleman Boxer: Boxing, Manners, and Masculinity in Eighteenth-Century England

Date

2010

Authors

Downing, Karen

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Sage Publications Inc

Abstract

Prize fighting was enormously popular during the second half of the eighteenth century in Britain. It became a fashion perhaps experienced as keenly by contemporary men of all classes as the "culture of sensibility" that describes this period of increasing politeness in society. This juxtaposition illustrates a vexing eighteenth-century issue: could a man be both polite and manly? This article argues that men across the social spectrum found in the "gentleman boxer" a resolution to this issue. The gentleman boxer synthesized traditionally held views of manliness with the civilizing effects of modern consumerism, acknowledged the concerns and aspirations of men of all classes, and responded to the political imperative for fighting men capable of forging a new nation bent on empire building. The gentleman boxer was both polite and manly and a fine example of a masculine identity negotiated between individual conceptions of the self and the material circumstances in which that self is found.

Description

Keywords

Keywords: Boxing; Eighteenth-century Britain; Masculine identity; Prize fighting

Citation

Source

Men and Masculinities

Type

Journal article

Book Title

Entity type

Access Statement

License Rights

DOI

10.1177/1097184X08318181

Restricted until

2037-12-31