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Ancient Human Bone Microstructure in Medieval England: Comparisons between Two Socio-Economic Groups

Miszkiewicz, Justyna; Mahoney, Patrick

Description

Understanding the links between bone microstructure and human lifestyle is critical for clinical and anthropological research into skeletal growth and adaptation. The present study is the first to report correspondence between socio-economic status and variation in bone microstructure in ancient humans. Products of femoral cortical remodeling were assessed using histological methods in a large human medieval sample (N = 450) which represented two distinct socio-economic groups. Osteonal...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMiszkiewicz, Justyna
dc.contributor.authorMahoney, Patrick
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-18T23:47:30Z
dc.date.available2016-01-18T23:47:30Z
dc.identifier.issn0003-276X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/95511
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding the links between bone microstructure and human lifestyle is critical for clinical and anthropological research into skeletal growth and adaptation. The present study is the first to report correspondence between socio-economic status and variation in bone microstructure in ancient humans. Products of femoral cortical remodeling were assessed using histological methods in a large human medieval sample (N = 450) which represented two distinct socio-economic groups. Osteonal parameters were recorded in posterior midshaft femoral sections from adult males (N = 233) and females (N = 217). Using univariate and multivariate statistics, intact, fragmentary, and osteon population densities, Haversian canal area and diameter, and osteon area were compared between the two groups, accounting for sex, age, and estimated femoral robusticity. The size of osteons and their Haversian canals, as well as osteon density, varied significantly between the socio-economic groups, although minor inconsistencies were observed in females. Variation in microstructure was consistent with historical textual evidence that describes differences in mechanical loading and nutrition between the two groups. Results demonstrate that aspects of ancient human lifestyle can be inferred from bone microstructure. Anat Rec, 299:42–59, 2016.
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rights© 2015 Wiley Periodicals.
dc.sourceThe Anatomical Record
dc.subjecthistology
dc.subjectfemur
dc.subjectsocio-economic status
dc.subjectbone health
dc.titleAncient Human Bone Microstructure in Medieval England: Comparisons between Two Socio-Economic Groups
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesAt the time of publication the author Miszkiewicz was affiliated with Skeletal Biology Research Centre, School of Anthropology and Conservation, University of Kent, Canterbury, United Kingdom.
local.identifier.citationvolume299
dc.date.issued2016-11-06
local.publisher.urlhttp://au.wiley.com/WileyCDA/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMiszkiewicz, J. J., College of Arts and Social Sciences, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1552-4914
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage42
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage59
local.identifier.doi10.1002/ar.23285
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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