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Adsorption of Ionic Surfactants to a Plasma Polymer Substrate

Atkin, R; Craig, Vincent; Hartley, Patrick G; Wanless, Erica J; Biggs, Simon

Description

The adsorption of an anionic C12 surfactant and cationic C12 and C16 surfactants to a synthetic, anionic radio frequency glow discharge plasma polymer substrate has been investigated. This substrate has a similar charge density to that of amorphous silica but also possesses hydrophobic character, producing a water sessile contact angle of about 74° at pH values between 2 and 7. Both the cationic and anionic C12 surfactants had the same saturation surface excess values on the plasma polymer...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorAtkin, R
dc.contributor.authorCraig, Vincent
dc.contributor.authorHartley, Patrick G
dc.contributor.authorWanless, Erica J
dc.contributor.authorBiggs, Simon
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:08:29Z
dc.identifier.issn0743-7463
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/86721
dc.description.abstractThe adsorption of an anionic C12 surfactant and cationic C12 and C16 surfactants to a synthetic, anionic radio frequency glow discharge plasma polymer substrate has been investigated. This substrate has a similar charge density to that of amorphous silica but also possesses hydrophobic character, producing a water sessile contact angle of about 74° at pH values between 2 and 7. Both the cationic and anionic C12 surfactants had the same saturation surface excess values on the plasma polymer substrate. Surprisingly, the addition of electrolyte did not affect the saturation surface excess, indicating that hydrophobic interactions between the surfactants and the substrate dominate the adsorption process. All surfactant systems show a change in slope in the isotherm at a surface excess of 0.3 mg·m-2. The likely conformation of the adsorbed surfactants at this surface excess is with the monomer lying flat on the substrate, to maximize hydrophobic interactions between the hydrocarbon chain and the surface. As the bulk concentration is increased further, adsorption is dominated by hydrophobic interactions. The structure of the adsorbed layer at saturation is discussed.
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society
dc.sourceLangmuir
dc.subjectKeywords: Addition reactions; Adsorption; Carrier concentration; Conformations; Contact angle; Electrolytes; Glow discharges; Hydrophobicity; pH effects; Plasmas; Surface active agents; Synthesis (chemical); Charge density; Ionic surfactants; Plasma polymer substra
dc.titleAdsorption of Ionic Surfactants to a Plasma Polymer Substrate
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume19
dc.date.issued2003
local.identifier.absfor030603 - Colloid and Surface Chemistry
local.identifier.absfor091209 - Polymers and Plastics
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub15675
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationAtkin, R, University of Bristol
local.contributor.affiliationCraig, Vincent, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHartley, Patrick G, CSIRO Molecular and Health Technologies
local.contributor.affiliationWanless, Erica J, University of Newcastle
local.contributor.affiliationBiggs, Simon, University of Newcastle
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage4222
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage4227
local.identifier.doi10.1021/la026852p
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T08:13:53Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0038022591
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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