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Weathering: cyclical or continuous? An Australian perspective

Taylor, G Jeffrey; Shirtliff, Greg

Description

A study of the age distribution of existing weathering profiles and related ferruginous products on the Australian continent was undertaken using information from published and unpublished sources. The age distribution of existing weathering profiles follows an increasing trend towards the present, which can be approximately represented by an exponential curve. This corresponds to similar trends relating to most other geological entities on earth and can be correlated with the process of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorTaylor, G Jeffrey
dc.contributor.authorShirtliff, Greg
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:07:01Z
dc.identifier.issn0812-0099
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/86031
dc.description.abstractA study of the age distribution of existing weathering profiles and related ferruginous products on the Australian continent was undertaken using information from published and unpublished sources. The age distribution of existing weathering profiles follows an increasing trend towards the present, which can be approximately represented by an exponential curve. This corresponds to similar trends relating to most other geological entities on earth and can be correlated with the process of recycling, that is, destruction over time and rebirth, possibly in another form. In accordance with general theory and past assumptions, a possible increase in weathering was observed at the beginning of the Tertiary, although this was much less significant than previous studies claimed. There is now reasonable evidence to suggest that such deviations from long-term trends may have occurred as a consequence of increases in the potential for preservation rather than as a direct result of climate influence, despite the well-known effect that precipitation has on weathering. A broad range of dates from Permian to the present, within a consortium of recognised dating techniques, supports the contention that weathering in Australia has been relatively continuous and did not occur as distinct episodes.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceAustralian Journal of Earth Sciences
dc.subjectKeywords: statistical analysis; timescale; trend analysis; weathering; weathering profile; Australia Australia; Time of weathering; Weathering; Weathering cycle
dc.titleWeathering: cyclical or continuous? An Australian perspective
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume50
dc.date.issued2003
local.identifier.absfor040399 - Geology not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub14764
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationTaylor, G Jeffrey, University of Hawaii
local.contributor.affiliationShirtliff, Greg, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage9
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage17
local.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1440-0952.2003.00970.x
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T08:07:39Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0037300693
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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