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The Detoxification Limitation Hypothesis: Where Did it Come From and Where is it Going?

Ford (previously Marsh), Karen; Wallis, Ian; Andrew, Rose; Foley, William

Description

The detoxification limitation hypothesis is firmly entrenched in the literature to explain various aspects of the interaction between herbivores and plant toxins. These include explanations for the existence of specialist and generalist herbivores and for the prevalence of each of these. The hypothesis suggests that the ability of mammalian herbivores to eliminate plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) largely determines which plants, and how much, they can eat. The value of the hypothesis is that...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorFord (previously Marsh), Karen
dc.contributor.authorWallis, Ian
dc.contributor.authorAndrew, Rose
dc.contributor.authorFoley, William
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:03:40Z
dc.identifier.issn0098-0331
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/85033
dc.description.abstractThe detoxification limitation hypothesis is firmly entrenched in the literature to explain various aspects of the interaction between herbivores and plant toxins. These include explanations for the existence of specialist and generalist herbivores and for the prevalence of each of these. The hypothesis suggests that the ability of mammalian herbivores to eliminate plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) largely determines which plants, and how much, they can eat. The value of the hypothesis is that it provides a clear framework for understanding how plant toxins might limit diet breadth. Thus, it is surprising, given its popularity, that there are few studies that provide experimental support either for or against the detoxification limitation hypothesis. There are two likely reasons for this. First, Freeland and Janzen did not formally propose the hypothesis, although it is implicit in their paper. Second, it is a difficult hypothesis to test, requiring an understanding of the metabolic pathways that lead to toxin elimination. Recent attempts to test the hypothesis appear promising. Results suggest that herbivores can recognize mounting saturation of a detoxification pathway and adjust their feeding accordingly to avoid intoxication. One strategy they use is to ingest a food containing a toxin that is metabolized by a different pathway. This demonstrates that careful selection of food plants is a key to existing in a chemically complex environment. As more studies characterize the detoxification products of PSMs, we will better understand how widespread this phenomenon is.
dc.publisherPlenum Publishing Corporation
dc.sourceJournal of Chemical Ecology
dc.subjectKeywords: toxin; detoxification; herbivore; mammal; secondary metabolite; chemistry; conference paper; drug detoxification; food preference; metabolism; plant; Food Preferences; Metabolic Detoxication, Drug; Plants; Toxins, Biological; Mammalia Chemical defense; Detoxification limitation hypothesis; Diet mixing; Food choice; Foraging; Mammalian herbivores; Plant secondary metabolites; Trichosurus vulpecula
dc.titleThe Detoxification Limitation Hypothesis: Where Did it Come From and Where is it Going?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume32
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.absfor060311 - Speciation and Extinction
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub13231
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationFord (previously Marsh), Karen, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWallis, Ian, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAndrew, Rose, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationFoley, William, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1247
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1266
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s10886-006-9082-3
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T07:50:34Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-33745168318
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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