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A case for mantle plumes

Davies, Geoffrey

Description

The existence of at least several plumes in the Earth's mantle can be inferred with few assumptions from well-established observations. As well, thermal mantle plumes can be predicted from well-established and quantified fluid dynamics and a plausible assumption about the Earth's early thermal state. Some additional important observations, especially of flood basalts and rift-related magmatism, have been shown to be plausibly consistent with the physical theory. Recent claims to have detected...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDavies, Geoffrey
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:58:06Z
dc.identifier.issn1001-6538
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/83301
dc.description.abstractThe existence of at least several plumes in the Earth's mantle can be inferred with few assumptions from well-established observations. As well, thermal mantle plumes can be predicted from well-established and quantified fluid dynamics and a plausible assumption about the Earth's early thermal state. Some additional important observations, especially of flood basalts and rift-related magmatism, have been shown to be plausibly consistent with the physical theory. Recent claims to have detected plumes using seismic tomography may comprise the most direct evidence for plumes, but plume tails are likely to be difficult to resolve definitively and the claims need to be well tested. Although significant questions remain about its viability, the plume hypothesis thus seems to be well worth continued investigation. Nevertheless there are many non-plate-related magmatic phenomena whose association with plumes is unclear or unlikely. Compositional buoyancy has recently been shown potentially to substantially complicate the dynamics of plumes, and this may lead to explanations for a wider range of phenomena, including "headless" hotspot tracks, than purely thermal plumes.
dc.publisherScience Press in China
dc.sourceChinese Science Bulletin
dc.subjectKeywords: Convection; Earth's mantle; Flood basalts; Hotspots; Plumes; Rift volcanism
dc.titleA case for mantle plumes
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume50
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor040403 - Geophysical Fluid Dynamics
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub11543
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationDavies, Geoffrey, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1541
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1554
local.identifier.doi10.1360/982005-918
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T07:21:08Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-33744935881
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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