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Predicting the distribution of livestock grazing pressure in rangelands

Pringle, H; Landsberg, Jill

Description

Because grazing by livestock is one of the primary threats to rangeland biodiversity, but is unevenly distributed in space, rangeland monitoring programmes need to take account of the distribution of grazing pressure in order to distinguish between grazing-induced change, seasonal fluctuations and changes that are a result of other threats. Livestock watering places are one of the major influences that give spatial expression to gradations in grazing activity. Using research results from the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPringle, H
dc.contributor.authorLandsberg, Jill
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:49:42Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:49:42Z
dc.identifier.issn1442-9985
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/80651
dc.description.abstractBecause grazing by livestock is one of the primary threats to rangeland biodiversity, but is unevenly distributed in space, rangeland monitoring programmes need to take account of the distribution of grazing pressure in order to distinguish between grazing-induced change, seasonal fluctuations and changes that are a result of other threats. Livestock watering places are one of the major influences that give spatial expression to gradations in grazing activity. Using research results from the goldfields of Western Australia, we show how distance from water can be incorporated in spatial models to predict cumulative grazing pressure at different sites within paddocks. Two surrogates of grazing activity are illustrated: one relying on a commercially available model, and one developed from measures of track density. Factors other than distance from water can also have profound effects on the distribution of grazing pressure and its impacts at landscape and regional scales, and we review some of these briefly. Finally, we outline key spatial implications for the design of rangeland monitoring programmes.
dc.publisherBlackwell Science Asia
dc.sourceAustral Ecology
dc.subjectKeywords: biodiversity; grazing pressure; livestock farming; rangeland; Australasia; Australia; Western Australia; Lasthenia Benchmarks; Grazing gradients; Monitoring; Track density; Watering points
dc.titlePredicting the distribution of livestock grazing pressure in rangelands
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume29
dc.date.issued2004
local.identifier.absfor050207 - Environmental Rehabilitation (excl. Bioremediation)
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub8911
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPringle, H, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLandsberg, Jill, James Cook University
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage31
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage39
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1442-9993.2004.01363.x
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T10:36:55Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-1542380496
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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