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Has the information revolution in Muslim societies created new publics?

Hashemi-Najafabadi, S. Adel

Description

In this essay, at the outset the meaning of 'public,' as it will be deployed in the article, will be delineated. Then by surveying new media, this study intends to show how the information revolution can bring social and political change in Muslim societies, especially in the Middle East. However, in this way a particular level of differentiation will be provided by distinguishing not just such media as satellite broadcasting from the Internet, but the second from the first generation of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHashemi-Najafabadi, S. Adel
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-16T22:52:26Z
dc.date.available2016-02-16T22:52:26Z
dc.identifier.issn1554-4419
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/733712901
dc.description.abstractIn this essay, at the outset the meaning of 'public,' as it will be deployed in the article, will be delineated. Then by surveying new media, this study intends to show how the information revolution can bring social and political change in Muslim societies, especially in the Middle East. However, in this way a particular level of differentiation will be provided by distinguishing not just such media as satellite broadcasting from the Internet, but the second from the first generation of the Internet. With regard to the relation between online activities and offline social and political behavior, particularly the role of some new Web 2.0 applications, such as Facebook and Twitter, in changing Muslim publics will be discussed and some specific examples from the Muslim world, especially Tran, will be presented. Finally, the implication of this study would be that the Internet may have something to do with the transition from authoritarianism to democracy.
dc.format18 pages
dc.publisherDe Gruyter
dc.rights© 2010 Berkeley Electronic Press. http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1554-4419/ Author can archive publisher's version/PDF, after a 12 months embargo period (Sherpa/Romeo as of 17/2/2016). http://www.degruyter.com/dg/page/576/repository-policy De Gruyter allows authors the use of the final published version of an article (publisher pdf) for self-archiving (author's personal website) and/or archiving in an institutional repository (on a non-profit server) after an embargo period of 12 months after publication (Publishers's archive policy website as of 17/2/2016).
dc.sourceMuslim World Journal of Human Rights
dc.subjectnew media
dc.subjectinformation revolution
dc.subjectdigital social networks
dc.subjectMuslim societies
dc.subjectpublic sphere
dc.titleHas the information revolution in Muslim societies created new publics?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume7
dc.date.issued2010-08-19
local.identifier.absfor220104
local.identifier.ariespublicationf2965xPUB918
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.bepress.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHashemi-Najafabadi, Adel, College of Arts and Social Sciences, CASS Research School of Social Sciences, Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1554-4419
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage16
local.identifier.doi10.2202/1554-4419.1187
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:33:53Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77956357102
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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