Skip navigation
Skip navigation

The Jebel Khalid Temple: Continuity and Change

Clarke, Graeme

Description

Excavation has revealed an amphiprostyle, Doric, east-facing temple, the construction of which appears to have commenced about the second quarter of the third century BCE. Whilst the outward appearance of the structure is undoubtedly Greek (although the Doric order is somewhat modified), the internal layout and proportions of the cella of the temple conform more to a Mesopotamian formula, with a tripartite adyton. This hybridity was no doubt deliberate and the statuary recovered in the course...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorClarke, Graeme
dc.contributor.editorMichael Blomer
dc.contributor.editorAchim Lichtenberger
dc.contributor.editorRubina Raja
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:11:58Z
dc.identifier.isbn9782503544458
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/63912
dc.description.abstractExcavation has revealed an amphiprostyle, Doric, east-facing temple, the construction of which appears to have commenced about the second quarter of the third century BCE. Whilst the outward appearance of the structure is undoubtedly Greek (although the Doric order is somewhat modified), the internal layout and proportions of the cella of the temple conform more to a Mesopotamian formula, with a tripartite adyton. This hybridity was no doubt deliberate and the statuary recovered in the course of excavation reflects a similar duality, ranging from heroic-sized Parian marble in Hellenistic style, through local but Hellenising limestone to crude local images. After the abandonment of the settlement of Jebel Khalid in the late 70s/early 60s BCE, the temple sit continued to be visited as a sacred area at least until the second century CE, a new temenos wall was constructed and 23 columnar incense altars were erected on the north, west and south sides of the temple. The Jebel Khalid temple constitutes a very rare example of a Greek-style temple of the Seleucid period in the Levant.
dc.publisherBrepols Publishers
dc.relation.ispartofReligious Identities in the Levant from Alexander to Muhammed: Continuity and Change
dc.relation.isversionof1 Edition
dc.titleThe Jebel Khalid Temple: Continuity and Change
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor210310 - Middle Eastern and African History
local.identifier.ariespublicationu8205243xPUB862
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationClarke, Graeme, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage142
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage155
local.identifier.absseo950599 - Understanding Past Societies not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2020-12-27T07:42:05Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationBelgium
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Clarke_The_Jebel_Khalid_Temple:_2015.pdf161.79 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy
02_Clarke_The_Jebel_Khalid_Temple:_2015.pdf5.76 MBAdobe PDF    Request a copy
03_Clarke_The_Jebel_Khalid_Temple:_2015.pdf6.51 MBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator