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Stomatal responses to CO2 during a diel Crassulacean acid metabolism cycle in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Kalanchoe pinnata

von Caemmerer, Susanne; Griffiths, Howard

Description

To investigate the diurnal variation of stomatal sensitivity to CO 2, stomatal response to a 30 min pulse of low CO2 was measured four times during a 24 h time-course in two Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Kalanchoe pinnata, which vary in the degree of succulence, and hence, expression and commitment to CAM. In both species, stomata opened in response to a reduction in pCO2 in the dark and in the latter half of the light period, and thus in CAM species,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorvon Caemmerer, Susanne
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Howard
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:01:42Z
dc.identifier.issn0140-7791
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/61706
dc.description.abstractTo investigate the diurnal variation of stomatal sensitivity to CO 2, stomatal response to a 30 min pulse of low CO2 was measured four times during a 24 h time-course in two Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Kalanchoe pinnata, which vary in the degree of succulence, and hence, expression and commitment to CAM. In both species, stomata opened in response to a reduction in pCO2 in the dark and in the latter half of the light period, and thus in CAM species, chloroplast photosynthesis is not required for the stomatal response to low pCO2. Stomata did not respond to a decreased pCO2 in K. daigremontiana in the light when stomata were closed, even when the supply of internal CO2 was experimentally reduced. We conclude that stomatal closure during phase III is not solely mediated by high internal pCO 2, and suggest that in CAM species the diurnal variability in the responsiveness of stomata to pCO2 could be explained by hypothesizing the existence of a single CO2 sensor which interacts with other signalling pathways. When not perturbed by low pCO2, CO2 assimilation rate and stomatal conductance were correlated both in the light and in the dark in both species.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourcePlant Cell and Environment
dc.subjectKeywords: carbon dioxide; dicotyledon; diurnal variation; metabolism; photosynthesis; stomatal conductance; Crassulaceae; Kalanchoe; Kalanchoe daigremontiana; Kalanchoe pinnata; carbon dioxide; article; chloroplast; Kalanchoe; light; metabolism; photoperiodicity; p Stomatal conductance
dc.titleStomatal responses to CO2 during a diel Crassulacean acid metabolism cycle in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Kalanchoe pinnata
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume32
dc.date.issued2009
local.identifier.absfor060705 - Plant Physiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9204316xPUB632
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationvon Caemmerer, Susanne, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGriffiths, Howard, University of Cambridge
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage567
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage576
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-3040.2009.01951.x
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T11:52:49Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-64149109217
local.identifier.thomsonID000265015100012
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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