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Population-level declines in Australian predators caused by an invasive species

Doody, J S; Green, B; Rhind, D; Castellano, C.M.; Sims, Rachel; Robinson, T.

Description

The cane toad Bufo marinus has been migrating westward across northern Australia since its introduction as a biological control agent in 1935. It has been implicated in the widespread decline of many native frog-eating predators. To investigate the impacts of this invasive species on native predatory reptiles, annual surveys were conducted from 2001 to 2007 to document variation in the relative abundances of three varanid lizards (Varanus mertensi, Varanus mitchelli and Varanus panoptes) and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDoody, J S
dc.contributor.authorGreen, B
dc.contributor.authorRhind, D
dc.contributor.authorCastellano, C.M.
dc.contributor.authorSims, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, T.
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:41:17Z
dc.identifier.issn1367-9430
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/57832
dc.description.abstractThe cane toad Bufo marinus has been migrating westward across northern Australia since its introduction as a biological control agent in 1935. It has been implicated in the widespread decline of many native frog-eating predators. To investigate the impacts of this invasive species on native predatory reptiles, annual surveys were conducted from 2001 to 2007 to document variation in the relative abundances of three varanid lizards (Varanus mertensi, Varanus mitchelli and Varanus panoptes) and one crocodile Crocodylus johnstoni species known to consume toads. In addition, the indirect effects of this variation on one agamid lizard Amphibolurus gilberti, a known prey item of V. panoptes, were also examined. Surveys were performed at two sites in northern Australia before and after the arrival of B. marinus. Significant declines in the relative abundances of all three species of varanid lizard were observed following toad arrival. Declines in the abundance of V. panoptes, V. mitchelli and V. mertensi at the two sites ranged 83-96, 71-97 and 87-93%, respectively. In contrast, A. gilberti increased by 23-26%; whereas there were no significant population-level declines in C. johnstoni despite observations of individual effects (i.e. several dead crocodiles with B. marinus in their stomachs). These findings suggest population-level changes in Australian lizards caused by an invasive species.
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.sourceAnimal Conservation
dc.subjectKeywords: abundance; amphibian; invasive species; lizard; population decline; predator-prey interaction; species conservation; Australasia; Australia; Agamidae; Alligator; Amphibia; Amphibolurus; Anura; Bufo marinus; Crocodylidae (all crocodiles); Crocodylus johnso Amphibians; Australia; Conservation; Invasive species; Predator-prey interactions; Relative abundance; Reptiles
dc.titlePopulation-level declines in Australian predators caused by an invasive species
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume12
dc.date.issued2009
local.identifier.absfor060201 - Behavioural Ecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB416
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationDoody, J S, University of Canberra
local.contributor.affiliationGreen, B, University of Canberra
local.contributor.affiliationRhind, D, University of Canberra
local.contributor.affiliationCastellano, C.M., University of Canberra
local.contributor.affiliationSims, Rachel, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRobinson, T., CSIRO Entomology
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage46
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage53
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1469-1795.2008.00219.x
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T12:05:04Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-59349089813
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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