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Adapting to extremes: Reconstructing evolution in response to changing climate over time and space in the diverse Australian plant genus Acacia

Hua, Xia; Cardillo, Marcel; Bromham, Lindell

Description

Aim Macroevolutionary analysis is increasingly being used to study biodiversity responses to climate change, for example by using phylogenetic node ages to infer periods of diversification, or phylogenetic reconstruction of traits to infer adaptation to particular stresses. Here we apply a recently developed macroevolutionary method to investigate the responses of a diverse plant genus, Acacia, to increasing aridity and salinity in Australia from the Miocene to the present. We ask whether...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHua, Xia
dc.contributor.authorCardillo, Marcel
dc.contributor.authorBromham, Lindell
dc.date.accessioned2024-04-03T02:56:37Z
dc.date.available2024-04-03T02:56:37Z
dc.identifier.issn0305-0270
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/316485
dc.description.abstractAim Macroevolutionary analysis is increasingly being used to study biodiversity responses to climate change, for example by using phylogenetic node ages to infer periods of diversification, or phylogenetic reconstruction of traits to infer adaptation to particular stresses. Here we apply a recently developed macroevolutionary method to investigate the responses of a diverse plant genus, Acacia, to increasing aridity and salinity in Australia from the Miocene to the present. We ask whether increase in tolerance of aridity and salinity coincided with periods of aridification, and if it allowed the radiation of Acacia into a wide range of niches. Taxon Acacia. Location Australia. Methods We applied the Niche Evolution Model (NEMo), which combines environmental (or ecological) niche modelling (ENM) with phylogenetic comparative methods (PCMs) in a single statistical framework, to a large database of Acacia presence-only records and presence–absence survey sites in order to infer current environmental tolerances of Australia Acacia species and reconstruct the evolution of environmental tolerance to increasing aridity and salinity. Results We find that patterns in evolution of Acacia, over time and across different habitat types, are consistent with the aridification history of Australia and suggests substantial ability to adapt to high aridity and salinity. Main conclusions Our results suggest that many Acacia lineages have been able to exploit new environments created during the aridification of Australia through evolution of environmental tolerance, resulting in their current dominance of many habitats across the continent. This study demonstrates that phylogenetic studies of the evolution of responses to changing environment can move beyond the application of simple trait-based models, allowing the underlying processes of speciation, adaptation and dispersal to be explicitly modelled in a macroecological and macroevolutionary context.
dc.description.sponsorshipAustralian Research Council
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.rights© 2022 The Authors. Journal of Biogeography published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceJournal of Biogeography
dc.subjectaridification
dc.subjectenvironmental niche modelling (ENM)
dc.subjectmacroecology
dc.subjectmacroevolution
dc.subjectphylogenetic comparative methods (PCM)
dc.subjectstress tolerance
dc.titleAdapting to extremes: Reconstructing evolution in response to changing climate over time and space in the diverse Australian plant genus Acacia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume49
dc.date.issued2022
local.identifier.absfor310400 - Evolutionary biology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB2313
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.wiley.com/en-gb
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHua, Xia, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCardillo, Marcel, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBromham, Lindell, College of Science, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage727
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage738
local.identifier.doi10.1111/jbi.14339
dc.date.updated2022-11-13T07:19:48Z
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
CollectionsANU Research Publications



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