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No phenotypic plasticity in nest-site selection in response to extreme flooding events

Bailey, Liam D.; Ens, Bruno J.; Both, Christiaan; Heg, Dik; Oosterbeek, Kees; van de Pol, Martijn

Description

Phenotypic plasticity is a crucial mechanism for responding to changes in climatic means, yet we know little about its role in responding to extreme climatic events (ECEs). ECEs may lack the reliable cues necessary for phenotypic plasticity to evolve; however, this has not been empirically tested. We investigated whether behavioural plasticity in nest-site selection allows a long-lived shorebird (Haematopus ostralegus) to respond to flooding. We collected longitudinal nest elevation data on...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBailey, Liam D.
dc.contributor.authorEns, Bruno J.
dc.contributor.authorBoth, Christiaan
dc.contributor.authorHeg, Dik
dc.contributor.authorOosterbeek, Kees
dc.contributor.authorvan de Pol, Martijn
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-19T02:06:57Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-8436
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/244037
dc.description.abstractPhenotypic plasticity is a crucial mechanism for responding to changes in climatic means, yet we know little about its role in responding to extreme climatic events (ECEs). ECEs may lack the reliable cues necessary for phenotypic plasticity to evolve; however, this has not been empirically tested. We investigated whether behavioural plasticity in nest-site selection allows a long-lived shorebird (Haematopus ostralegus) to respond to flooding. We collected longitudinal nest elevation data on individuals over two decades, during which time flooding events have become increasingly frequent. We found no evidence that individuals learn from flooding experiences, showing nest elevation change consistent with random nest-site selection. There was also no evidence of phenotypic plasticity in response to potential environmental cues (lunar nodal cycle and water height). A small number of individuals, those nesting near an artificial sea wall, did show an increase in nest elevation over time; however, there is no conclusive evidence this occurred in response to ECEs. Our study population showed no behavioural plasticity in response to changing ECE patterns. More research is needed to determine whether this pattern is consistent across species and types of ECEs. If so, ECEs may pose a major challenge to the resilience of wild populations.
dc.description.sponsorshipFor this project, L.D.B. was supported by an Australian Postgraduate Award scholarship and M.v.d.P. by the Australian Research Council (FT120100204).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherRoyal Society of London
dc.rights© 2017 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society
dc.sourcePhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London Series B
dc.subjectclimate change ecology
dc.subjectHaematopus ostralegus
dc.subjectextreme climatic event
dc.subjectlearning
dc.subjectsea-level rise
dc.subjectenvironmental cues
dc.titleNo phenotypic plasticity in nest-site selection in response to extreme flooding events
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume372
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor060201 - Behavioural Ecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB7019
local.publisher.urlhttp://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBailey, Liam, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationEns, Bruno J., SOVON Dutch Centre for Field Ornithology
local.contributor.affiliationBoth, Christiaan, University of Groningen
local.contributor.affiliationHeg, Dik, University of Bern
local.contributor.affiliationOosterbeek, Kees, SOVON Dutch Centre for Field Ornithology
local.contributor.affiliationvan de Pol, Martijn, College of Science, ANU
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT120100204
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1723
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage20160139
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage20160139
local.identifier.doi10.1098/rstb.2016.0139
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T10:53:07Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85019135507
local.identifier.thomsonID000400921300005
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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