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Linking photosynthesis and leaf N allocation under future elevated CO2 and climate warming in Eucalyptus globulus

Sharwood, Robert; Crous, Kristine Y; Whitney, Spencer; Ellsworth, David S; Ghannoum, Oula

Description

Leaf-level photosynthetic processes and their environmental dependencies are critical for estimating CO2 uptake from the atmosphere. These estimates use biochemical-based models of photosynthesis that require accurate Rubisco kinetics. We investigated the effects of canopy position, elevated atmospheric CO2 [eC; ambient CO2 (aC)+240 ppm] and elevated air temperature (eT; ambient temperature (aT)+3 °C) on Rubisco content and activity together with the relationship between leaf N and Vcmax...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSharwood, Robert
dc.contributor.authorCrous, Kristine Y
dc.contributor.authorWhitney, Spencer
dc.contributor.authorEllsworth, David S
dc.contributor.authorGhannoum, Oula
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-02T00:10:12Z
dc.date.available2021-08-02T00:10:12Z
dc.identifier.issn0022-0957
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/242573
dc.description.abstractLeaf-level photosynthetic processes and their environmental dependencies are critical for estimating CO2 uptake from the atmosphere. These estimates use biochemical-based models of photosynthesis that require accurate Rubisco kinetics. We investigated the effects of canopy position, elevated atmospheric CO2 [eC; ambient CO2 (aC)+240 ppm] and elevated air temperature (eT; ambient temperature (aT)+3 °C) on Rubisco content and activity together with the relationship between leaf N and Vcmax (maximal Rubisco carboxylation rate) of 7 m tall, soil-grown Eucalyptus globulus trees. The kinetics of E. globulus and tobacco Rubisco at 25 °C were similar. In vitro estimates of Vcmax derived from measures of E. globulus Rubisco content and kinetics were consistent, although slightly lower, than the in vivo rates extrapolated from gas exchange. In E. globulus, the fraction of N invested in Rubisco was substantially lower than for crop species and varied with treatments. Photosynthetic acclimation of E. globulus leaves to eC was underpinned by reduced leaf N and Rubisco contents; the opposite occurred in response to eT coinciding with growth resumption in spring. Our findings highlight the adaptive capacity of this key forest species to allocate leaf N flexibly to Rubisco and other photosynthetic proteins across differing canopy positions in response to future, warmer and elevated [CO2] climates.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis is a contribution from the Hawkesbury Forest Experiment. We thank Burhan Amiji and Dr Craig Barton for their assistance in undertaking gas exchange. This research was supported by funding from ARC grant DP160102452, the Forest Industries Climate Change Research Fund from the Australian Department of Agriculture, and the Commonwealth Government through the Education Investment Fund.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.rights© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceJournal of Experimental Botany
dc.subjectCanopy position
dc.subjectelevated CO2 and temperature
dc.subjectEucalyptus globulus
dc.subjectphotosynthesis
dc.subjectRubisco kinetics
dc.subjectVcmax
dc.subjectwhole-tree chambers
dc.titleLinking photosynthesis and leaf N allocation under future elevated CO2 and climate warming in Eucalyptus globulus
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume68
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor060705 - Plant Physiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4956746xPUB657
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/exbotj/openaccess.html
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSharwood, Robert, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCrous, Kristine Y, University of Western Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationWhitney, Spencer, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationEllsworth, David S, University of Western Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationGhannoum, Oula, College of Science, ANU
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP160102452
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1157
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1167
local.identifier.doi10.1093/jxb/erw484
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T10:45:40Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85018964215
local.identifier.thomsonID000397161300021
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution License
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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