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An extension of the transport-motion detection limit using speed-tuned global-motion systems

Greenwood, John; Edwards, Mark

Description

When transparent motion is defined purely by direction differences, no more than two signal directions can be detected simultaneously. This limit appears to occur because higher signal intensities are required to detect transparent motion compared with uni-directional motion (Edwards, M., & Greenwood, J. A. (2005). The perception of motion transparency: A signal-to-noise limit. Vision Research, 45, 1877-1884). Increasing the effective signal intensities should therefore increase the number of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGreenwood, John
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:39:40Z
dc.identifier.issn0042-6989
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/23973
dc.description.abstractWhen transparent motion is defined purely by direction differences, no more than two signal directions can be detected simultaneously. This limit appears to occur because higher signal intensities are required to detect transparent motion compared with uni-directional motion (Edwards, M., & Greenwood, J. A. (2005). The perception of motion transparency: A signal-to-noise limit. Vision Research, 45, 1877-1884). Increasing the effective signal intensities should therefore increase the number of signals that can be detected. We achieved this by adding speed differences, dividing transparent-motion signals between two speed-tuned global-motion systems. When some signals moved at appropriate low speeds and others at high speeds, up to three signals were detected. This is consistent, at least in part, with the signal-to-noise processing basis of the transparency limit. Differences in contrast polarity were also used to assess whether the limit could be extended using stimulus features without independent global-motion systems. A modest improvement in performance was obtained, suggesting that there may be multiple routes to extending the transparent-motion limit.
dc.publisherPergamon-Elsevier Ltd
dc.sourceVision Research
dc.subjectKeywords: article; controlled study; hearing; human; human experiment; perceptive discrimination; priority journal; signal detection; vision; visual stimulation; visual threshold; Computer Graphics; Contrast Sensitivity; Humans; Motion Perception; Pattern Recogniti Global motion; Motion perception; Speed processing; Transparency
dc.titleAn extension of the transport-motion detection limit using speed-tuned global-motion systems
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume46
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.absfor170112 - Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance
local.identifier.ariespublicationU9312950xPUB29
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationGreenwood, John, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationEdwards, Mark, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1440
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1449
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.visres.2005.07.020
dc.date.updated2015-12-07T10:51:51Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-30444457403
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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