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Olfactory predator recognition in the brown mouse lemur (Microcebus rufus) in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar

Deppe, Anja M.; Kushnick, Geoff

Description

Predator odors such as urine and feces are known to elicit antipredator behaviors in prey including avoidance, fear, and curiosity. We measured how wild brown mouse lemurs (Microcebus rufus) responded to odors of mammalian, avian, and snake predators as well as nonpredator controls. The first experiment took place under controlled conditions in a laboratory where we recorded the occurrence of four behavioral categories (ignore, curiosity, alert, and fear) in response to a single odor. Subjects...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDeppe, Anja M.
dc.contributor.authorKushnick, Geoff
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-02T03:34:27Z
dc.identifier.citationDeppe AM, Kushnick G. Olfactory predator recognition in the brown mouse lemur (Microcebus rufus) in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar. Am J Primatol. 2020;82:e23184. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajp.23184
dc.identifier.issn1098-2345
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/221236
dc.description.abstractPredator odors such as urine and feces are known to elicit antipredator behaviors in prey including avoidance, fear, and curiosity. We measured how wild brown mouse lemurs (Microcebus rufus) responded to odors of mammalian, avian, and snake predators as well as nonpredator controls. The first experiment took place under controlled conditions in a laboratory where we recorded the occurrence of four behavioral categories (ignore, curiosity, alert, and fear) in response to a single odor. Subjects exhibited behavioral change significantly more often in response to the predator than to control stimuli, but did not distinguish between familiar and unfamiliar predators. Mammalian predator urine and feces were most likely to elicit behavioral change. The owl was the only predator to never elicit behavioral change, possibly because owls do not provide relevant odor cues. A second experiment employing live traps in the forest found that neither predator nor control odors affected the likelihood of capture. Due to their longevity, odors do not provide accurate information of spatial and temporal risk, and while mouse lemurs may have initially hesitated to enter a trap, in the absence of additional information about risk, they may have eventually ignored the stimuli. This study found that brown mouse lemurs are able to distinguish between predator and nonpredator odors, and that risk assessment may be affected by the experience, as well as predator and sensory stimulus quality.
dc.description.sponsorshipIdea Wild; Primate Conservation Inc.; National Science Foundation, Grant/Award Numbers: 0721233, 0726166; Stony Brook University, Grant/Award Number: Graduate student grant; Conservation International, Primate Action Fund
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc
dc.rights© 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC
dc.sourceAmerican Journal of Primatoloty
dc.subjectantipredation behavior
dc.subjectnocturnal primate
dc.subjectpredation
dc.subjectsensory ecology
dc.subjecttrapping
dc.titleOlfactory predator recognition in the brown mouse lemur (Microcebus rufus) in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume82
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-07-14
dc.date.issued2020-08-08
local.identifier.absfor160102 - Biological (Physical) Anthropology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu6269649xPUB1046
local.publisher.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationDeppe, Anja M., Centre ValBio
local.contributor.affiliationKushnick, Geoff, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue10
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage12
local.identifier.doi10.1002/ajp.23184
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
local.identifier.absseo970117 - Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.date.updated2020-11-15T07:28:05Z
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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