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Shadow puppets and neglected diseases (2): A qualitative evaluation of a health promotion performance in rural Indonesia

Williams, Courtney; Stewart, Donald; Bendrups, Dan; Laksono, Budi; Susilo, Joko; Gray, Darren; Amaral, Salvador; Kurscheid, Johanna

Description

Performing arts used as a method of spreading health information dates back to the origins of storytelling. However, interventions in developing, non-Western countries typically utilize Western entertainment forms. This qualitative investigation assesses responses to an intervention designed around traditional Javanese shadow puppetry (wayang kulit). Semi-structured interviews provided in-depth responses from a sample (N = 12) of villagers. Responses analyzed both cross-case and within-case,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Courtney
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Donald
dc.contributor.authorBendrups, Dan
dc.contributor.authorLaksono, Budi
dc.contributor.authorSusilo, Joko
dc.contributor.authorGray, Darren
dc.contributor.authorAmaral, Salvador
dc.contributor.authorKurscheid, Johanna
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-25T02:24:40Z
dc.date.available2019-11-25T02:24:40Z
dc.identifier.issn1661-7827
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/186568
dc.description.abstractPerforming arts used as a method of spreading health information dates back to the origins of storytelling. However, interventions in developing, non-Western countries typically utilize Western entertainment forms. This qualitative investigation assesses responses to an intervention designed around traditional Javanese shadow puppetry (wayang kulit). Semi-structured interviews provided in-depth responses from a sample (N = 12) of villagers. Responses analyzed both cross-case and within-case, focused on perceptions of the music and storyline, responses to the intervention, and the perceived appropriateness of wayang kulit for disseminating a health message. Wayang kulit was considered to be interesting and easy to remember, but concerns remained regarding the reliability of information provided through the drama. The fusion of traditional and modern music and story elements were perceived positively. Some participants were inspired to improve their hygiene practices, although the lack of motivation, or belief that they were unable to change was noted. The performance was generally received positively in terms of the nature of the intervention, the fusion of traditional and Western music and story elements, as well as the use of wayang kulit to spread health information. The study provides guidance for modifications to the production, prior to scaling up.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Australian National Commission for UNESCO (2015-16) provided funding for the development of the shadow puppet production: application 2015-16023. The Commission’s web site is: http://dfat.gov.au/international-relations/internationalorganisations/un/unesco/pages/australia n-national-commission-for-unesco.aspx. The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade through the Australia-Indonesia Institute (2016-17) provided funding for the evaluation of the impact of the shadow puppet production in Central Java: application AII201700012. The Australia Indonesia Institute’s web site is: http://dfat.gov.au/people-to-people/foundations-councils-institutes/australia-indonesiainstitute/Pages/ australia-indonesia-institute.aspx.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.rights© 2018 The Author(s).
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
dc.titleShadow puppets and neglected diseases (2): A qualitative evaluation of a health promotion performance in rural Indonesia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume15
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor111708 - Health and Community Services
local.identifier.absfor111715 - Pacific Peoples Health
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3102795xPUB157
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationWilliams, Courtney, Griffith University
local.contributor.affiliationStewart, Donald, Griffith University
local.contributor.affiliationBendrups, Dan, La Trobe University
local.contributor.affiliationLaksono, Budi, Yayasan Wahana Bakti Sejatera (YWBS) Foundation
local.contributor.affiliationSusilo, Joko, Otago University
local.contributor.affiliationGray, Darren, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAmaral, Salvador, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKurscheid (previously Johnson), Johanna, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue12
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage12
local.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph15122829
local.identifier.absseo920109 - Infectious Diseases
local.identifier.absseo920503 - Health Related to Specific Ethnic Groups
local.identifier.absseo920205 - Health Education and Promotion
dc.date.updated2019-05-19T08:20:47Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85058768211
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenance© 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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