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Australia's evolving food practices: a risky mix of continuity and change

Venn, Danielle; Banwell, Cathy; Dixon, Jane

Description

To investigate trends in five key aspects of Australian food practice which have been implicated in diet-related health risks, specifically energy intake. They are: the replacement of home-prepared foods by commercially prepared foods; consumer reliance on ultra-processed foods; de-structured dining; increased pace of eating; and a decline in commensal eating. Data were from repeated cross-sections from the national Household Expenditure and Time Use Surveys. Trends in food practice aspects...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorVenn, Danielle
dc.contributor.authorBanwell, Cathy
dc.contributor.authorDixon, Jane
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-15T02:04:51Z
dc.date.available2019-10-15T02:04:51Z
dc.identifier.issn1368-9800
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/176963
dc.description.abstractTo investigate trends in five key aspects of Australian food practice which have been implicated in diet-related health risks, specifically energy intake. They are: the replacement of home-prepared foods by commercially prepared foods; consumer reliance on ultra-processed foods; de-structured dining; increased pace of eating; and a decline in commensal eating. Data were from repeated cross-sections from the national Household Expenditure and Time Use Surveys. Trends in food practice aspects were examined using indicators of food expenditure across different food groups and time spent eating and cooking, including where, when and with whom eating activities took place. Australia, 1989–2010. Nationally representative samples of Australian households. The share of the total food budget spent on food away from home rose steadily from 22·8 % in 1989 to 26·5 % in 2010, while spending on ultra-processed foods increased. The basic patterning of meals and the pace of eating changed little, although people spent more time eating alone and at restaurants. Cooking time declined considerably, particularly for women. These changes have occurred over the same time that obesity and diet-related, non-communicable diseases have increased rapidly in Australia. Some aspects are implicated more than others: particularly the shift from domestic cooking to use of pre-prepared and ultra-processed foods, a reduction in time spent in food preparation and cooking, as well as an upsurge in time and money devoted to eating away from home. These are all likely to operate through the higher energy content of commercially prepared, compared with unprocessed or lightly processed, foods.
dc.description.sponsorshipFinancial support: This work was supported by the Australian Research Council of Australia (ARC) Discovery Project (DP1400102856).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.rights© The Authors 2016
dc.sourcePublic Health Nutrition
dc.titleAustralia's evolving food practices: a risky mix of continuity and change
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume20
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor111711 - Health Information Systems (incl. Surveillance)
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB4324
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationVenn, Danielle, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBanwell, Cathy, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationDixon, Jane, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP140102856
local.bibliographicCitation.issue14
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage2549
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage2558
local.identifier.doi10.1017/S136898001600255X
local.identifier.absseo920411 - Nutrition
dc.date.updated2019-05-05T08:56:32Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84988591475
local.identifier.thomsonIDMEDLINE:27652992
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1368-9800/..."Publisher's version/PDF on institutional repository, non-commercial subject-based repositories, such as PubMed Central, UK PMC or arXiv, after a 12 month embargo from the date of publication" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 14/10/19).
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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