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Bridging the synaptic gap: neuroligins and neurexin I in Apis mellifera

Biswas, Sunita; Russell, Robyn J; Jackson, Colin J; Vidovic, Maria; Ganeshina, Olga; Oakeshott, John Graham; Claudianos, Charles

Description

Vertebrate studies show neuroligins and neurexins are binding partners in a trans-synaptic cell adhesion complex, implicated in human autism and mental retardation disorders. Here we report a genetic analysis of homologous proteins in the honey bee. As in humans, the honeybee has five large (31-246 kb, up to 12 exons each) neuroligin genes, three of which are tightly clustered. RNA analysis of the neuroligin-3 gene reveals five alternatively spliced transcripts, generated through alternative...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBiswas, Sunita
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Robyn J
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Colin J
dc.contributor.authorVidovic, Maria
dc.contributor.authorGaneshina, Olga
dc.contributor.authorOakeshott, John Graham
dc.contributor.authorClaudianos, Charles
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-27T23:48:53Z
dc.date.available2015-10-27T23:48:53Z
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/16132
dc.description.abstractVertebrate studies show neuroligins and neurexins are binding partners in a trans-synaptic cell adhesion complex, implicated in human autism and mental retardation disorders. Here we report a genetic analysis of homologous proteins in the honey bee. As in humans, the honeybee has five large (31-246 kb, up to 12 exons each) neuroligin genes, three of which are tightly clustered. RNA analysis of the neuroligin-3 gene reveals five alternatively spliced transcripts, generated through alternative use of exons encoding the cholinesterase-like domain. Whereas vertebrates have three neurexins the bee has just one gene named neurexin I (400 kb, 28 exons). However alternative isoforms of bee neurexin I are generated by differential use of 12 splice sites, mostly located in regions encoding LNS subdomains. Some of the splice variants of bee neurexin I resemble the vertebrate alpha- and beta-neurexins, albeit in vertebrates these forms are generated by alternative promoters. Novel splicing variations in the 3' region generate transcripts encoding alternative trans-membrane and PDZ domains. Another 3' splicing variation predicts soluble neurexin I isoforms. Neurexin I and neuroligin expression was found in brain tissue, with expression present throughout development, and in most cases significantly up-regulated in adults. Transcripts of neurexin I and one neuroligin tested were abundant in mushroom bodies, a higher order processing centre in the bee brain. We show neuroligins and neurexins comprise a highly conserved molecular system with likely similar functional roles in insects as vertebrates, and with scope in the honeybee to generate substantial functional diversity through alternative splicing. Our study provides important prerequisite data for using the bee as a model for vertebrate synaptic development.
dc.description.sponsorshipAustralian National University PhD Scholarship Award to Sunita Biswas.
dc.format19 pages
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.rights© 2008 Biswas et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.sourcePLoS ONE
dc.subjectalternative splicing
dc.subjectanimals
dc.subjectbees
dc.subjectbrain
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectgene expression profiling
dc.subjectgene expression regulation, developmental
dc.subjectglycoproteins
dc.subjectglycosylation
dc.subjectmodels, molecular
dc.subjectneural cell adhesion molecules
dc.subjectneuropeptides
dc.subjectphylogeny
dc.subjectpolymorphism, genetic
dc.subjectprotein isoforms
dc.subjectsequence homology
dc.subjectsynapses
dc.titleBridging the synaptic gap: neuroligins and neurexin I in Apis mellifera
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume3
dcterms.dateAccepted2008-08-16
dc.date.issued2008-10-31
local.identifier.absfor170112
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4005981xPUB600
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.plos.org/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBiswas, Sunita, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, CMBE Research School of Biology, Division of Biomedical Science and Biochemistry, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationRussell, Robyn, CSIRO Division of Entomology, Australia
local.contributor.affiliationJackson, Colin J, CSIRO Entomology, Australia
local.contributor.affiliationVidovic, Maria, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, CMBE Research School of Biology, Division of Biomedical Science and Biochemistry, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationGaneshina, Olga, University of Queensland, Australia
local.contributor.affiliationOakeshott, John Graham, CSIRO Division of Entomology, Australia
local.contributor.affiliationClaudianos, Charles, University of Queensland, Australia
local.identifier.essn1932-6203
local.bibliographicCitation.issue10
local.bibliographicCitation.startpagee3542
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage19
local.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0003542
local.identifier.absseo970106
dc.date.updated2015-12-10T08:16:43Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-56349151980
local.identifier.thomsonID000265131700001
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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