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Two roles for ecological surrogacy: Indicator surrogates and management surrogates

Hunter, Malcolm J.; Westgate, Martin; Barton, Philip; Calhoun, Aram; Peirson, Jennifer; Tulloch, Ayesha; Beger, Maria; Branquinho, Cristina; Caro, Tim; Gross, John; Heino, Jani; Lane, Peter; Longo, Catherine; Martin, Kathy; McDowell, William H.; Mellin, Camille; Salo, Hanna; Lindenmayer, David B

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Ecological surrogacy—here defined as using a process or element (e.g., species, ecosystem, or abiotic factor) to represent another aspect of an ecological system—is a widely used concept, but many applications of the surrogate concept have been controversial. We argue that some of this controversy reflects differences among users with different goals, a distinction that can be crystalized by recognizing two basic types of surrogate. First, many ecologists and natural resource managers measure...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHunter, Malcolm J.
dc.contributor.authorWestgate, Martin
dc.contributor.authorBarton, Philip
dc.contributor.authorCalhoun, Aram
dc.contributor.authorPeirson, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorTulloch, Ayesha
dc.contributor.authorBeger, Maria
dc.contributor.authorBranquinho, Cristina
dc.contributor.authorCaro, Tim
dc.contributor.authorGross, John
dc.contributor.authorHeino, Jani
dc.contributor.authorLane, Peter
dc.contributor.authorLongo, Catherine
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Kathy
dc.contributor.authorMcDowell, William H.
dc.contributor.authorMellin, Camille
dc.contributor.authorSalo, Hanna
dc.contributor.authorLindenmayer, David B
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-22T04:06:19Z
dc.date.available2018-11-22T04:06:19Z
dc.identifier.citationHunter, M., Westgate, M., Barton, P., Calhoun, A., Pierson, J., Tulloch, A., Beger, M., Branquinho, M., Caro, T., Gross, J., Heino, J., Lane, P., Longo, C., Martin, K., McDowell, W.H., Mellin, C., Salo, H. and Lindenmayer, D.B. (2016). Two roles for ecological surrogacy: Indicator surrogates and management surrogates. Ecological Indicators, 63, 121-125.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/151825
dc.description.abstractEcological surrogacy—here defined as using a process or element (e.g., species, ecosystem, or abiotic factor) to represent another aspect of an ecological system—is a widely used concept, but many applications of the surrogate concept have been controversial. We argue that some of this controversy reflects differences among users with different goals, a distinction that can be crystalized by recognizing two basic types of surrogate. First, many ecologists and natural resource managers measure “indicator surrogates” to provide information about ecological systems. Second, and often overlooked, are “management surrogates” (e.g., umbrella species) that are primarily used to facilitate achieving management goals, especially broad goals such as “maintain biodiversity” or “increase ecosystem resilience.” We propose that distinguishing these two overarching roles for surrogacy may facilitate better communication about project goals. This is critical when evaluating the usefulness of different surrogates, especially where a potential surrogate might be useful in one role but not another. Our classification for ecological surrogacy applies to species, ecosystems, ecological processes, abiotic factors, and genetics, and thus can provide coherence across a broad range of uses.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe work in this paper was funded by the Australian Research Council though a Laureate Fellowship to DBL
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.sourceEcological Indicators
dc.source.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolind.2015.11.049
dc.subjectcoarse-filter, environmental management, flagship species, focal species, indicators, monitoring, environmental proxy, surrogates, terminology, umbrella species.
dc.titleTwo roles for ecological surrogacy: Indicator surrogates and management surrogates
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume63
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-11-22
dc.date.issued2015-12-23
local.publisher.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolind.2015.11.049
local.type.statusSubmitted Version
local.contributor.affiliationDepartment of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Conservation Biology, University of Maine, Orono, Maine 04649, U.S.A.
local.contributor.affiliationFenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage121
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage125
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ecolind.2015.11.049
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceAuthor's Pre-print: green tick author can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing) Author's Post-print: green tick author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) Publisher's Version/PDF: cross author cannot archive publisher's version/PDF
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