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Trans-biome diversity in Australian grass-specialist lizards (Diplodactylidae: Strophurus)

Laver, Rebecca J.; Nielsen, Stuart V.; Rosauer, Dan F.; Oliver, Paul M.

Description

Comparisons of biodiversity patterns within lineages that occur across major climate gradients and biomes, can provide insights into the relative roles that lineage history, landscape and climatic variation, and environmental change have played in shaping regional biotas. In Australia, while there has been extensive research into the origins and patterns of diversity in the Australian Arid Zone (AAZ), how diversity is distributed across this biome and the Australian Monsoonal Tropics (AMT) to...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLaver, Rebecca J.
dc.contributor.authorNielsen, Stuart V.
dc.contributor.authorRosauer, Dan F.
dc.contributor.authorOliver, Paul M.
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-03T04:30:02Z
dc.identifier.issn1055-7903
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/139046
dc.description.abstractComparisons of biodiversity patterns within lineages that occur across major climate gradients and biomes, can provide insights into the relative roles that lineage history, landscape and climatic variation, and environmental change have played in shaping regional biotas. In Australia, while there has been extensive research into the origins and patterns of diversity in the Australian Arid Zone (AAZ), how diversity is distributed across this biome and the Australian Monsoonal Tropics (AMT) to the north, has been less studied. We compared the timing and patterns of diversification across this broad aridity gradient in a clade of lizards (Strophurus: phasmid geckos) that only occur in association with a unique Australian radiation of sclerophyllous grasses (Triodia: spinifex). Our results indicate that overall genetic diversity is much higher, older and more finely geographically structured within the AMT, including distantly related clades endemic to the sandstone escarpments of the Kimberley and Arnhem Plateau. Niche modelling analyses also suggest that the distribution of taxa in the AMT is more strongly correlated with variation in topographic relief than in the AAZ. The two broad patterns that we recovered - (i) lineage endemism increases as latitude decreases, and (ii) endemism is tightly correlated to rocky regions - parallel and corroborate other recent studies of habitat generalists and specialised saxicoline lineages occurring across these same regions. Early Miocene diversification estimates also suggest that, soon after Triodia grasses colonised Australia and began to diversify in the Miocene, phasmid geckos with Gondwanan ancestry shifted into these grasses, and have subsequently remained closely associated with this unique vegetation type.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by a linkage grant from the Australian Research Council to PMO, Michael Lee and Paul Doughty, a McKenzie Postdoctoral fellowship to PMO from the University of Melbourne, and an ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award to PMO.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights© 2017 Elsevier.
dc.sourceMolecular phylogenetics and evolution
dc.subjectaustralian arid zone
dc.subjectaustralian monsoonal tropics
dc.subjectcryptic diversity
dc.subjectnorthern deserts
dc.subjectspinifex
dc.subjectvegetative change
dc.subjectanimals
dc.subjectaustralia
dc.subjectbiodiversity
dc.subjectecosystem
dc.subjecteye proteins
dc.subjectgtp-binding protein regulators
dc.subjecthomeodomain proteins
dc.subjectlizards
dc.subjectnadh dehydrogenase
dc.subjectphosphoproteins
dc.subjectphylogeny
dc.subjectreceptors, prolactin
dc.titleTrans-biome diversity in Australian grass-specialist lizards (Diplodactylidae: Strophurus)
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume115
dc.date.issued2017-10
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.elsevier.com/
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationOliver, P. M., Division of Evolution & Ecology, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1095-9513
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage62
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage70
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ympev.2017.07.015
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1055-7903/..."Author's post-print on open access repository after an embargo period of between 12 months and 48 months" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 3/01/18).
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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