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Predictors of injurious falls and fear of falling differ: an 11-year longitudinal study of incident events in older people

Clemson, Lindy; Kendig, Hal; Mackenzie, Lynette; Browning, Colette

Description

OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study is to identify the intrinsic, psychosocial and lifestyle factors, which, over time, predict the incidence of having a fall requiring medical attention (injurious fall) or of acquiring a fear of falling (FOF). METHOD: Data from 1,000 participants in the Melbourne Longitudinal Studies on Healthy Ageing (MELSHA, 1994-2005) were analyzed using cox regressions and hazard ratios. RESULTS: The predictors of injurious falls (n = 900, events = 200) were increasing...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorClemson, Lindy
dc.contributor.authorKendig, Hal
dc.contributor.authorMackenzie, Lynette
dc.contributor.authorBrowning, Colette
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-02T03:15:12Z
dc.date.available2015-04-02T03:15:12Z
dc.identifier.issn0898-2643
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/13165
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The objective of the study is to identify the intrinsic, psychosocial and lifestyle factors, which, over time, predict the incidence of having a fall requiring medical attention (injurious fall) or of acquiring a fear of falling (FOF). METHOD: Data from 1,000 participants in the Melbourne Longitudinal Studies on Healthy Ageing (MELSHA, 1994-2005) were analyzed using cox regressions and hazard ratios. RESULTS: The predictors of injurious falls (n = 900, events = 200) were increasing age, slower gait speed, and being depressed. Main predictors of developing a FOF (n = 855, events =117) were increasing age, cognitive impairment, reduced social activity, and gender. A history of falls at baseline did not predict acquiring a FOF nor did FOF predict a future fall. DISCUSSION: The profile of the person who will have an injurious fall differs from the profile of the person who develops a FOF and should be considered when designing interventions.
dc.publisherSage
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2014
dc.sourceJournal of Aging and Health
dc.subjectaccidental falls
dc.subjectaged
dc.subjectcommunity-residing
dc.subjectinjurious falls
dc.subjectolder adults
dc.titlePredictors of injurious falls and fear of falling differ: an 11-year longitudinal study of incident events in older people
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume27
dc.date.issued2015-02-09
local.identifier.absfor111702 - Aged Health Care
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4321547xPUB84
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.uk.sagepub.com/home.nav
local.type.statusPublished version
local.contributor.affiliationKendig, H., Centre for Research on Ageing, Health & Wellbeing, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1552-6887
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage239
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage256
local.identifier.doi10.1177/0898264314546716
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T08:22:19Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84922908923
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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