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Why the climate is more sensitive to carbon dioxide than weather records suggest

Glikson, Andrew

Description

One of the key questions about climate change is the strength of the greenhouse effect. In scientific terms this is described as “climate sensitivity”. It’s defined as the amount Earth’s average temperature will ultimately rise in response to a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. Climate sensitivity has been hard to pin down accurately. Climate models give a range of 1.5-4.5℃ per doubling of CO₂, whereas historical weather observations suggest a smaller range of 1.5-3.0℃ per...[Show more]

CollectionsANU Research Publications
Date published: 2017
Type: Commentary
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/120969
Source: The Conversation
Access Rights: Open Access

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