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School (non-)attendance and 'mobile cultures': theoretical and empirical insights from Indigenous Australia

Prout, Sarah; Biddle, Nicholas

Description

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australians are significantly and substantially less likely to be attending school on a given day than their non-Indigenous counterparts. This has been shown to have long-term consequences for the development of the mainstream literacy and numeracy skills associated with formal schooling, as well as later school and employment outcomes. Reducing this gap is a key focus of government education policy within Australia. Hampering the design of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorProut, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorBiddle, Nicholas
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-14T23:19:33Z
dc.identifier.issn1361-3324
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/102940
dc.description.abstractAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australians are significantly and substantially less likely to be attending school on a given day than their non-Indigenous counterparts. This has been shown to have long-term consequences for the development of the mainstream literacy and numeracy skills associated with formal schooling, as well as later school and employment outcomes. Reducing this gap is a key focus of government education policy within Australia. Hampering the design of effective policy, however, is the lack of a robust empirical and theoretical framework to explain school (non-)attendance that not only builds on existing research, but also reflects the specific circumstances and aspirations of Indigenous students and their families. This article applies mixed-methods quantitative and qualitative techniques to explore what Indigenous student (non-)attendance in Australia might tell us regarding the relationship between highly marginalised student groups and formal education systems. A robust understanding of these geographically and socio-culturally situated school (non-)attendance patterns and processes allows us to build on and contribute to human capital, critical, resistance, and other behavioural theories of formal education and draw parallels for other population sub-groups globally, especially those that display ongoing patterns of high geographic mobility. Our analysis suggests that absenteeism amongst marginalised and/or highly mobile populations, may be most usefully conceived of as a manifestation of structural incompatibilities between formal schooling systems and the life projects and circumstances of these school-aged children and their families.
dc.publisherCarfax Publishing Ltd.
dc.sourceRace Ethnicity and Education
dc.titleSchool (non-)attendance and 'mobile cultures': theoretical and empirical insights from Indigenous Australia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
dc.date.issued2016
local.identifier.absfor130199 - Education Systems not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB11786
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationProut, Sarah, University of Western Australia
local.contributor.affiliationBiddle, Nicholas, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage15
local.identifier.doi10.1080/13613324.2016.1150831
dc.date.updated2016-06-14T08:40:43Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84961203087
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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