Canberra Album

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  • ItemOpen Access
    Bridge to the Cotter Trout Hatchery, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:43:21Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    Four girls at the near end of a narrow wooden bridge over a stream running through bushland. One of the girls is adjusting her shoe while two others examine something that one child holds in her hands. The children all have ribbons in their hair and wear dresses. The bridge has a white painted railing on only one side. The large trees near the water are she oaks (casuarinas) while the pale tree trunks further away are probably those of eucalypts. The Cotter Trout Hatchery is to the right on the far side of the footbridge opposite the picnic area. It was a government -run hatchery that existed from the 1930s until 1979, when it was demolished. After Lake Burley Griffin was constructed in 1964, trout from the hatchery were used to stock the lake.This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Motorists picnic under autumn tinted trees at the Cotter Reserve, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:43:19Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    Scene with three cars in which a woman and man contemplate the autumn foliage of large plane trees. The area is equipped with a tap near the closest tree and two sets of tables and benches. On one of the benches can be seen large paper bags. Beyond the deciduous trees are evergreen shrubs and a grassy bank with a post and wire fence.The Cotter Reserve, which is about 20 kilometres west of Canberra was a favourite picnic area because it was one of the few places in the Territory that had facilities such as taps and tables. It lies a couple of kilometres down from the junction of the Cotter and Murrumbidgee Rivers. The Reserve is near the Cotter Dam which was built in 1915 and was Canberra's first water supply.This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Royal Canberra Golf Course, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:43:17Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    Scene with men playing golf while spectators and caddies look on. The setting is a smooth rolled rectangular lawn with a sandpit on the right, amid low grassy hills and trees. The trees include pines and Lombardy poplars with in the background a growth of eucalypts. As early as 1913, Director General of Works, Colonel Percy Owen suggested the establishment of a golf course near what is now the city centre. When that land was taken over by a new workmen's camp in 1922, the golfers moved to Acton where they shared the site with the racecourse. In 1926 the Federal Capital Commission constructed a new golf course at Acton on the banks of the Molonglo River and in 1933 the Club was granted royal status by King George V. With the imminent formation of Lake Burley Griffin by damming the Molonglo, the Royal Canberra Golf Club moved to its present site at Westbourne Woods in Yarralumla.This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Hotel Canberra, Yarralumla, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:43:14Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    View from Commonwealth Avenue of women playing croquet in the grounds of the Hotel Canberra, with in the background the low-lying, deep-roofed buildings of the Hotel's south wing. The grounds include croquet lawns, rose beds and extensive plantings of trees such as Lombardy poplars and conifers. Originally a government hostel, it was built by the Federal Capital Commission to plans by John Murdoch, who had been asked to design the hostel along garden pavilion lines. One and two storey accommodation wings radiate from garden courtyards in this form of architecture.The strong horizontal feel of the complex is also an expression of the influence of the American Prairie style. Hotel Canberra originally opened as Hostel No 1 in 1925. It did not yet have hotel status because prohibition prevented liquor sales. In 1927 it became the government managed Hotel Canberra. From 1950 to 1974 it was leased to Tooheys Brewery and when the lease expired was used as government offices until 1985. In 1987 it was re-opened as Hyatt Hotel Canberra. As the hotel is located a short walk away from Parliament House it has accommodated and still accommodates many parliamentarians and visiting dignitaries. In the past, the members who stayed at Hotel Canberra tended to be those from the conservative parties, while Labour politicians preferred Hotel Kurrajong. The Canberra Croquet Club was established 8 March 1928 and its members still play on the Hyatt Hotel croquet lawns.This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Albert Hall, Yarralumla, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:43:11Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    View from Commonwealth Avenue of Canberra's Assembly Hall, as it was originally called. The Hall was opened on 10 March 1928 by Prime Minister Stanley Bruce. He re-named it Albert Hall in honour of Albert, Duke of York who had opened Parliament and the London Albert Hall, centre of British musical culture. Until 1965 when the Canberra Theatre Centre opened, Albert Hall was Canberra's main venue for concerts, dances and other occasions. Federal Capital Commission architect John Kirkpatrick, assisted by Robert Casboulte and Henry Rolland, designed it in the Classical Revival style. It features a Roman-tiled hipped roof, Ionic pilasters and roundel medallion ornaments under the eaves. The building's symmetrical front façade boasts a porte-cochere entrance large enough for vehicle access. This picture shows the building in its original stone colour, which has since been over-painted in white. The landscaping includes Atlantic cedars (Cedrus atlantica), lawns, rose beds and a sundial, set within a backdrop of trees. The sundial stands on a pedestal that was once part of the Houses of Parliament, Westminster, UK. A parking meter is installed to the right of the porte-cochere.This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Canberra Community Hospital, Acton, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:43:09Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    View of entrance area of the complex of buildings that constituted the Canberra Hospital. The architectural style is modern and unadorned. It is constructed of bricks with a tile roof. Facilities for car parking and close vehicle access have been catered for in the design. A hospital of timber structures had existed in Acton since 1913, but in 1942 a modern brick hospital was completed. Initially, the new building was occupied by the United States Army Medical Corps, but the Canberra Hospital Board was able to take over the premises in February 1943. Canberra Community Hospital was known as Royal Canberra Hospital between 1979 and 1996 and was the only Canberra hospital until Woden Valley Hospital was built in the 1960s. Royal Canberra Hospital was closed in 1991 and demolished by implosion 13 July 1997. This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Institute of Anatomy, Acton, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:43:06Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    View of the front entrance of the building created to house the anatomy collection donated to the nation by Sir Colin Mackenzie in 1922. Designed by W. Hayward Morris with the assistance of Robert Casboulte and Malcolm Moir, the Institute was completed in 1930. Architecturally, it is an example of Art Deco style as seen in the fluted pilasters along the façade that flanks the curved entrance bay. All the capitals are carved with goannas among ferns and waratahs, and are examples of the building's many decorative elements inspired by Australian animals and plants.The Institute is set within a planting of evergreen hedges, conifers, lawns and prunus trees. It served as a natural history museum and a resource for research into human nutrition until December 1985. It is now occupied by ScreenSound Australia: the National Screen and Sound Archive. This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    First section of the National Library, Barton, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:43:04Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    View of the front entrance and façade of the building intended to house the National and Parliamentary Libraries, as well as serve as a public lending library. It was designed by Edward Henderson in the Stripped Classical style with features such as Corinthian columns within the entrance alcove and regularly spaced vertical windows. A relief border with inserts that runs below the roof of the nearest façade introduces a horizontal decorative element. The building is set within a planting of conifers, roses and prunus trees.The foundation stones for the building were laid in November 1934 by the Governor-General and the Poet-Laureate John Masefield. For economic reasons only the one wing was completed and in 1968 it was demolished and the new National Library built on a site within the Parliamentary triangle. This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    The visual room at Ainslie Primary School, Braddon, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:43:01Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    Photograph of a classroom equipped for special use. The equipment includes a film projector, screen and blackout curtains as well as a radio and sheets of music.The room is lined with column heaters, is decorated with boldly patterned textiles and has both bench and chair seating. Ainslie Primary School was built in 1938 to a design by Charles Whitley, an architect employed by the Department of Works. It was the first primary school in Australia to have incorporated into its planning a library, lecture room and needlework room. This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    A class at work at Ainslie Primary School, Braddon, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:43:00Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    Photograph of girls and boys sitting at double desks and writing with pencils while a male teacher attends to a student at the back. Many of the children are in school uniform which includes tunics for girls and ties for boys. Most girls wear ribbons in their hair.The wooden desks have holes to hold ink wells and decorative corner supports. On the walls are some landscape painting reproductions and maps of Tasmania. Through the windows can be glimpsed the slope of Mount Ainslie and the dome of the Australian War Memorial. Ainslie Primary School was built in 1938 to a design by Charles Whitley, an architect employed by the Department of Works. It was the first primary school in Australia to have incorporated into its planning a library, lecture room and needlework room. This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    The library at Ainslie Primary School, Braddon, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:42:59Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    Scene with schoolchildren reading books in a room lined with book shelves on one wall and timber panelling on another. The room features Art Deco decorative details such as arrow-like ventilators and a fluted light fitting. A model sailing ship is displayed on top of the bookshelf and there are also hanging three paintings by Mrs J. L. Neilson. The pictures were inspired by children's books that were popular at the time and include the mad hatter's teaparty from Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland. Ainslie Primary School was built in 1938 to a design by Charles Whitley, an architect employed by the Department of Works. It was the first primary school in Australia to have incorporated into its planning a library, lecture room and needlework room. This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Exterior and playground of Ainslie Primary School, Braddon, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:42:58Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    View looking towards Mount Ainslie of children engaged in various activities on the large grass areas at the back of Ainslie Primary School. On the near side of a wide path, girls in school uniform ring a woman teacher while further away are two long rows of boys. The main two-storeyed block of the building is symmetrically disposed either side of a central structure accentuated by two vertical piers. The school was built in 1938 to a design by Charles Whitley, an architect employed by the Department of Works. Architecturally, it is an example of Art Deco style as seen in the flat roof and fluted decoration on the piers. The school was the first in Australia to have incorporated into its planning a library, lecture room and needlework room. This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Children having a nap at the Nursery School, Acton, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:42:57Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    Photograph of a group of children lying on wooden fold-out beds arranged in rows. Each child lies on a couple of blankets. The room has timber floors and frosted glass-panelled doors. Around the walls are low shelves holding various objects including toys, books and a vase of flowers.The Nursery School building had originally been the isolation block of Canberra Community Hospital, but government funding enabled it to be refurbished along the lines of the Lady Gowrie Child Centres.This was Canberra's first nursery school and it was opened in 1944 by Lady Gowrie. The headmistress was Miss Hinsby. The building was in use as a nursery school until 1952 when it became a primary school.This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Children selecting toys at the Nursery School, Acton, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:42:55Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    A photograph of four small children examining a range of toys distributed on shelves and one boy playing with a connecting wagon on the floor. The toys appear to be mostly made of wood and include different coloured blocks, reels, boats, miniature furniture and brick walls. There are also tall cylinders that are presumably toy containers. The room's floor is timber and there is a brick fireplace on the left. The Nursery School building had originally been the isolation block of Canberra Community Hospital, but government funding enabled it to be refurbished along the lines of the Lady Gowrie Child Centres. This was Canberra's first nursery school and it was opened in 1944 by Lady Gowrie. The headmistress was Miss Hinsby. The building was in use as a nursery school until 1952 when it became a primary school.This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Children painting at the Nursery School, Acton, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:42:53Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    A photograph of several small children wearing protective smocks over their clothes painting on sheets of paper attached to easels with bulldog clips.The activity is probably taking place on a partly enclosed veranda. Both floors and walls are timber.The Nursery School building had originally been the isolation block of Canberra Community Hospital, but government funding enabled it to be refurbished along the lines of the Lady Gowrie Child Centres. This was Canberra's first nursery school and it was opened in 1944 by Lady Gowrie. The headmistress was Miss Hinsby. The building was in use as a nursery school until 1952 when it became a primary school. This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Nursery School, Acton, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:42:52Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    View of a fenced playground in front of a long timber building set among gum trees.There are several adults visible and about a dozen children. The playground equipment includes a sandpit, a climbing frame with a slide and a few small stepladders. A wide ramp leads to the school's porch. The Nursery School building had originally been the isolation block of Canberra Community Hospital, but government funding enabled it to be refurbished along the lines of the Lady Gowrie Child Centres. This was Canberra's first nursery school and it was opened in 1944 by Lady Gowrie. The headmistress was Miss Hinsby. The building was in use as a nursery school until 1952 when it became a primary school.This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Canberra Boys' Grammar School and oval, Red Hill, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:42:51Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    View of school buildings seen from a sports oval edged by Lombardy poplars.The buildings include the Headmaster's residence on the left and next to it, the Administration centre. Canberra Grammar School is a boarding and day school for boys. It was established by the Anglican authorities in 1929 when the existing Monaro Grammar School was moved from Cooma. Architects, Burcham Clamp and Finch, designed the two-storey red brick complex in the Tudor Revival style with features such as gabled roofs, carved stone entrances and cloister-like colonnades. Individual buildings were completed at different stages, but until the 1960s mostly in a style consistent with the original Medieval appearance.This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Canberra Girls' Grammar School, Deakin, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:42:49Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    Photograph of a gravel driveway that leads through well-treed gardens to a Tudor Revival style building. The school, which was originally known as St Gabriel's Church of England Grammar School, is a half-timbered brick structure with a tile roof and dormer and bay windows. It was built in 1927 to a design by architects L.H. Rudd and D. E. Limberg. Girls in school uniform can be glimpsed in the shade cast by trees and on a bench on the left.The garden planting includes eucalyptus trees, cypresses and oleanders.This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the Australian National University over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Boys and girls change places at Canberra High School, Acton, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:42:48Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    Photograph of a teacher demonstrating the use of planes to eight girls in a woodwork classroom. The group stand around a workbench to which is attached a vice. Along the walls are shelves and boards from which hang various tools. The teacher, who has a short, back and sides haircut, wears a protective coat while the girls' school tunics are protected by aprons. Canberra High School, designed by Charles Whitley, opened in 1939 and was regarded as one of the most modern high schools in Australia. Over 300 students attended at the time the picture was taken. In the 1960s the school vacated the Acton site and occupied a new building in Macquarie. Over a number of years the old premises came to be used as an art school. In 1992 the Canberra Institute of the Arts, as it was now called, amalgamated with the Australian National University.This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the ANU over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Boys and girls change places at Canberra High School, Acton, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    (2004-02-25T22:42:47Z) Commonwealth Department of Information
    Photograph of boys mixing flour in a domestic science classroom. The students stand at marble topped benches surrounded by various utensils such as flour scoops and sieves and with their hands in bowls. The boys all wear white aprons. Along the wall under the windows is a sink and an oven. Canberra High School, designed by Charles Whitley, opened in 1939 and was regarded as one of the most modern high schools in Australia. Over 300 students attended at the time the picture was taken. In the 1960s the school vacated the Acton site and occupied a new building in Macquarie. Over a number of years the old premises came to be used as an art school. In 1992 the Canberra Institute of the Arts, as it was now called, amalgamated with the Australian National University.This photograph is from an album that was held at the London office of the ANU over the period 1949 to 1952. The album was used to inform prospective staff about Canberra. These images are part of the series produced by the Department of Information and kept at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. National Archives holdings in this series have gaps and some images may be held only at the ANU Archives.