ANU College of Asia & the Pacific

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Research at the College of Asia and the Pacific is driven by a triple commitment - to innovative disciplinary expertise, to deep engagement with our subjects, and to solutions that address policy challenges. Our research is designed to help better understand the evolving dynamics of our region and support transformative social change. We serve as both a practical resource and a trusted partner for all who focus on Asia and the Pacific.

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Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 20 of 63
  • ItemOpen Access
    The Trump Administration's First 100 Days: What should Asia do? [Edition 1]
    (Canberra, ACT: The Australian National University. College of Asia & the Pacific, 2018) Australian National University. College of Asia & the Pacific
    Experts from across The Australian National University’s College of Asia & the Pacific have been watching and assessing the impact of Trump on the Asia Pacific during the first hundred days of his Presidency. The result is a collection of essays that provide a fascinating and varied portrait of how the new Administration has affected the world’s most dynamic region, and how the region is likely to react.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Australian foreign policy futures: Making middle-power leadership work?
    (Canberra, ACT: Department of International Relations, The Australian National University, 2008-04) Elliott, Lorraine; Fry, Greg; Tow, William T.; Ravenhill, John; Elliott, Lorraine
  • ItemOpen Access
    Perfection [Edition 5]
    (Canberra, ACT: The Australian National University. College of Asia & the Pacific, 2019) Australian National University. College of Asia & the Pacific
  • ItemOpen Access
    The Hindu Revival in Java: Politics and Religious Identity
    (The Australian National University, Research School of Pacific Studies, 1980) Lyon, Margaret (Margot) L.
  • ItemEmbargo
    Securing our energy [Edition 4]
    (Canberra, ACT: The Australian National University. College of Asia & the Pacific, 2018) Australian National University. College of Asia & the Pacific
  • ItemOpen Access
    Nuclear Asia [Edition 2]
    (Canberra, ACT: The Australian National University. College of Asia & the Pacific, 2017) Australian National University. College of Asia & the Pacific
  • ItemOpen Access
    Can Japan’s golden golf diplomacy win over Donald Trump?
    (ANU College of Asia & the Pacific, The Australian National University, 2017) Envall, H. D. P.
    When Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe visited then US President-elect Donald Trump in November 2016, he presented Trump with a Honmas Beres S-05 golf driver embellished with gold and intended, apparently, ‘for players seeking a higher trajectory and slice correction.’ The clubs were well received (even if, as it turned out, they were made in China). So when the two leaders met again in February 2017, they played golf together and spent five hours discussing United States-Japan relations. Abe has therefore received strong marks for his Trump diplomacy, with subsequent opinion polling suggesting that 70 per cent of Japanese were satisfied with the results of the Trump-Abe meeting. For Abe, such statecraft recreates the successful golf diplomacy pursued by his grandfather, Nobusuke Kishi, as Japanese Prime Minister. Kishi golfed with US President Dwight D. Eisenhower during alliance negotiations in the 1950s. So does Abe’s golden golf gift represent a new diplomatic triumph for Japan? In answering this, it is important to ask two further questions. How do Trump’s foreign policies affect Japan’s interests? And what can Abe do through diplomacy to address these effects?
  • ItemEmbargo
    People Movement [Edition 3]
    (Canberra, ACT : College of Asia & the Pacific. The Australian National University., 2018)
    The politics of people movement is a defining feature of the 21st century, with profound ramifications for every country in the Asia Pacific region, including Australia. This collection examines many of the region's most troubling situations of people on the move while giving considered attention to the opportunities for better national and regional responses. Australia's conversation about migrants and refugees is too often defined in the narrow terms of economic self-interests, security threats and humanitarian obligations. Fresh ideas are desperately needed if Australia is to make a constructive contribution across the Asia Pacific over the decades ahead.
  • ItemOpen Access
    The origin of poverty in Indonesia
    (The Australian National University, Research School of Pacific Studies) Reid, Anthony
    The causes of Asian poverty are usually discussed by economists, sometimes by sociologists. Historians tend to avoid the long-term sources of the problem, perhaps because of an assumption that the problem is unreal. The origins of capitalism and of the industrial revolution lie in Europe, and therefore the causes for the enormous gulf in living standards between Europe and Southern Asia in the twentieth century are also assumed to lie in Europe. The assumption behind this one-sidedness is that the dynamic of change lay in Europe while most of the rest of the world, including Indonesia, has been relatively inert and unchanging. In reality, change has been the rule of Southeast Asia as in Europe, and we must examine the pattern of this change to understand both the relative and the absolute dimensions of poverty.
  • ItemOpen Access
    (Re?) Discovering chiefs: traditional authority and the restructuring of local-level government in Papau New Guinea
    (Canberra, ACT : Dept. of Political and Social Change, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, The Australian National University., 1997) May, Ronald
    This paper looks briefly at the discussion of traditional authority in the anthropological literature, examines the emerging political discourse on 'chiefs' within Papua New Guinea, and comments on its contemporary political significance.
  • ItemOpen Access
    The Trump Administration's First 100 Days: What should Asia do?
    (Canberra, ACT : College of Asia & the Pacific. The Australian National University., 2017) The Australian National University. College of Asia & the Pacific.
    Experts from across The Australian National University’s College of Asia & the Pacific have been watching and assessing the impact of Trump on the Asia Pacific during the first hundred days of his Presidency. The result is a collection of essays that provide a fascinating and varied portrait of how the new Administration has affected the world’s most dynamic region, and how the region is likely to react.
  • ItemOpen Access
    The South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty : a critical assessment
    (Canberra, ACT: Peace Research Centre, The Australian National University, 1990) Hamel-Green, Michael
    In August 1985, eight South Pacific Forum states signed the Rarotonga Treaty, establishing a nuclear-free zone in the South Pacific region, including Australia, New Zealand and island states south of the equator. The treaty came into force in late 1986 and has been recognised internationally at the UN and by two nuclear powers, the Soviet Union and China. However, the two nuclear powers with the most extensive nuclear involvement in the region, France and the United States, have declined to recognise the treaty and sign the protocol. Michael Hamel-Green's study critically assesses the limited and selective character of the treaty - which prohibits nuclear testing and land based stationing of nuclear weapons but permits transit, mobile deployment and some forms of control - and examines the Australian Government's motivations in initiating and negotiating the measure. The study analyses both regional and nuclear weapon state responses to the treaty and concludes with a discussion of its security and disarmament implications.
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    Bursting Boundaries or Hypermedia Bubble?: Networked Hypermedia and Pacific History
    (Australian National University, 2002) Turnbull, Paul
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    Diasporic Returns: The sociology of a globalised rapprochement
    (Australian National University, 2002) Tapp, Nicholas
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    The Afghan Tragedy and the US Responses
    (Dept. of International Relations, RSPAS, Australian National University, 2001) Saikal, Amin
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    Australia's Response
    (Dept. of International Relations, RSPAS, Australian National University, 2001) Harris, Stuart
  • ItemEmbargo
    Lost in Translation
    (Australian National University, 2009) Aspinall, Edward
  • ItemOpen Access
    China's agricultural trade after WTO's world accession
    (College of Asia & the Pacific. Australian National University, 2006) Chen, Chunlai
  • ItemOpen Access
    Can China rescue the world climate change negotiations?
    (Australian National University, 2009) Howes, Stephen
  • ItemEmbargo
    Vanuatu's recent economic success: lessons for the Pacific
    (College of Asia and the Pacific. Australian National University, 2009) Howes, Stephen