Family size preference and use of contraception in Peninsular Malaysia

Date

1983

Authors

Rahman, Aminah Abdul

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Publisher

Canberra, ACT : The Australian National University

Abstract

This study is an investigation of family size preference and the use of contraception among some currently married women in Peninsular Malaysia. The data are derived from the Ethnicity and Fertility Survey Malaysia, 1980 conducted by the National Family Planning Board, Malaysia. Findings from the analysis show that responses from the preference questions are not mere rationalisation of existing children but are meaningful indications of the family size norms. The role of ethnicity in influencing family size preference is quite extensive even after controlling for some demographic and socio-economic factors. However, the potential role of education especially in the rural areas, is significant and may be able to narrow the ethnic differences. The use of contraception seems to generally increase when the preferred number of children has been achieved and/or when there is excess fertility. However, among the Malays, this is mainly in the form of ineffective methods in contrast to the Chinese and Indians who tend to use more effective methods. At the same time, there are also indications that some women prefer to have excess children than to suffer the side-effects of contraception.

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Source

Type

Thesis (Masters sub-thesis)

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Access Statement

Open Access

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DOI

10.25911/5d6c3abe77b1c

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