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Questioning the sustainability of primary health care innovation

Sibthorpe, Beverly; Glasgow, Nicholas; Wells, Robert

Description

According to Starfield,1 the birth of contemporary interest in primary health care can be traced back to the 30th annual meeting of the World Health Assembly in 1977. This meeting set in motion a series of activities including, in the subsequent year, the Declaration of Alma-Ata.2 Drawing on the principles enunciated in this Declaration and a more recent review,3 the Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute (APHCRI) has defined primary health care as: . . . socially appropriate,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSibthorpe, Beverly
dc.contributor.authorGlasgow, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorWells, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:58:15Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:58:15Z
dc.identifier.issn0025-729X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/83381
dc.description.abstractAccording to Starfield,1 the birth of contemporary interest in primary health care can be traced back to the 30th annual meeting of the World Health Assembly in 1977. This meeting set in motion a series of activities including, in the subsequent year, the Declaration of Alma-Ata.2 Drawing on the principles enunciated in this Declaration and a more recent review,3 the Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute (APHCRI) has defined primary health care as: . . . socially appropriate, universally accessible, scientifically sound first level care provided by a suitably trained workforce supported by integrated referral systems and in a way that gives priority to those most in need, maximises community and individual self-reliance and participation and involves collaboration with other sectors. It includes health promotion, illness prevention, care of the sick, advocacy and community development.
dc.publisherAustralasian Medical Association
dc.sourceMedical Journal of Australia
dc.source.urihttps://www.mja.com.au/journal/2005/183/10/questioning-sustainability-primary-health-care-innovation
dc.subjectKeywords: alcohol; alcohol consumption; article; Australia; cigarette smoking; community care; developing country; evidence based medicine; government; health behavior; health care cost; health care financing; health care manpower; health care organization; health
dc.titleQuestioning the sustainability of primary health care innovation
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume183
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor111717 - Primary Health Care
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub11637
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSibthorpe, Beverly, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGlasgow, Nicholas, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWells, Robert, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue10
local.bibliographicCitation.startpageS52
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpageS53
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T07:21:54Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-28444463204
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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