Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Roman Diplomacy

Burton, Paul

Description

In the main, Roman diplomacy (509 bce–14 ce) consisted of establishing treaties of peace (marking the end of wars), of alliance (in peacetime or during wars), and generals' agreements in the field (during wars); sending and receiving embassies (delegations of high‐ranking citizens) to air complaints and congratulations, establish alliances, declare war, investigate matters affecting Roman security interests, settle disputes, and demand satisfaction for (perceived) injuries; and offering and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBurton, Paul
dc.contributor.editorGordon Martel
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-17T03:42:08Z
dc.identifier.isbn9781118887912
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/206340
dc.description.abstractIn the main, Roman diplomacy (509 bce–14 ce) consisted of establishing treaties of peace (marking the end of wars), of alliance (in peacetime or during wars), and generals' agreements in the field (during wars); sending and receiving embassies (delegations of high‐ranking citizens) to air complaints and congratulations, establish alliances, declare war, investigate matters affecting Roman security interests, settle disputes, and demand satisfaction for (perceived) injuries; and offering and accepting interstate mediations of disputes and wars. Roman diplomatic vocabulary grew out of likely primitive practices overseen by priests, called fetiales, who oversaw foreign relations between Rome and other Italian states. The practice of deditio, the demand for absolute surrender by another state to Rome's complete discretion, probably had its roots in ancient Italian practice as well. In the historical period, Rome's international partnerships consisted of numerous informal amicitiae, “friendships,” and comparatively few formal treaties of alliance. Rome was often a willing broker of interstate mediations, but a less willing participant.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherJohn Wiley and Sons Ltd
dc.relation.ispartofThe Encyclopedia of Diplomacy
dc.relation.isversionof1st Edition
dc.rights© 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
dc.subject3500 BCE –1 CE
dc.subject1–999 CE
dc.subjectancient diplomacy
dc.subjectancient history
dc.subjectdiplomacy and international relations
dc.subjectRoman history
dc.subjectRoman Republic
dc.titleRoman Diplomacy
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
dc.date.issued2018-05-03
local.identifier.absfor210306 - Classical Greek and Roman History
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9803255xPUB2205
local.publisher.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBurton, Paul, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage10
local.identifier.doi10.1002/9781118885154.dipl0477
local.identifier.absseo970121 - Expanding Knowledge in History and Archaeology
dc.date.updated2020-04-05T08:20:18Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationUnited States
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Burton_Roman_Diplomacy_2018.pdf1.77 MBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator