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A grammar of the Kuku Yalanji language of North Queensland

Patz, Elisabeth

Description

This study is concerned with two dialects of the Kuku Yalanji language, Yalanji and Nyungkul, that together still have a homogeneous speech community of at least 300 speakers. The approach is predominantly functional, concentrating largely on semantic aspects and contextual use of language forms, particularly in the areas of case marking, syntax, and particles and clitics. The study concludes with an investigation of narrative discourse structure that highlights the practical application...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPatz, Elisabeth
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-26T03:47:45Z
dc.date.available2017-10-26T03:47:45Z
dc.date.copyright1982
dc.identifier.otherb1240420
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/132444
dc.description.abstractThis study is concerned with two dialects of the Kuku Yalanji language, Yalanji and Nyungkul, that together still have a homogeneous speech community of at least 300 speakers. The approach is predominantly functional, concentrating largely on semantic aspects and contextual use of language forms, particularly in the areas of case marking, syntax, and particles and clitics. The study concludes with an investigation of narrative discourse structure that highlights the practical application of many of the grammatical features discussed in the preceding chapters. Four texts, included in the appendix, serve to illustrate these points. Significant characteristics of this language that are discussed more fully than others are: (a) vowel harmony rules, (b) the distinction between 'neutral' and 'potent' case inflections, (c) passive and antipassive constructions. Throughout the study reference is made to similarities or differences with neighbouring languages Guugu Yimidhirr and Dyabugay, as well as to features of Australian languages in general. Points related to linguistic theory are made in the discussions of passive and antipassive (transitivity theory), subordinate clauses (ergative versus accusative syntax), and choice and marking of topics in narrative discourse (topic prominent versus subject prominent languages).
dc.format.extent442 l
dc.language.isoen
dc.subject.lcshAustralian languages
dc.subject.lcshQueensland Languages
dc.titleA grammar of the Kuku Yalanji language of North Queensland
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorDixon, R.M.W.
local.contributor.supervisorKoch, Harold
dcterms.valid1982
local.description.notesThesis (Ph.D.)--Australian National University, 1982. This thesis has been made available through exception 200AB to the Copyright Act.
local.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.issued1982
local.contributor.affiliationThe Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d723dece84fc
dc.date.updated2017-10-06T00:20:28Z
local.mintdoimint
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