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‘Ecstasy’ and the use of sleep medications in a general community sample: a four-year follow-up

Tait, Robert J; George, Amanda; Olesen, Sarah

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Aims: Animal models show that a single dose of MDMA (‘ecstasy’) can result in long-term disruption of sleep. We evaluated the relationship between ecstasy consumption and the use of sleep medications in humans after controlling for key factors. Design: The Personality and Total Health Through Life project uses a longitudinal cohort with follow-up every four years. This study reports data from waves two and three. Setting: Participants were recruited from the electoral roll in the Australian...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorTait, Robert J
dc.contributor.authorGeorge, Amanda
dc.contributor.authorOlesen, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-06T04:02:42Z
dc.date.available2014-01-06T04:02:42Z
dc.identifier.issn0965-2140
dc.identifier.issn1360-0443
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/11147
dc.description.abstractAims: Animal models show that a single dose of MDMA (‘ecstasy’) can result in long-term disruption of sleep. We evaluated the relationship between ecstasy consumption and the use of sleep medications in humans after controlling for key factors. Design: The Personality and Total Health Through Life project uses a longitudinal cohort with follow-up every four years. This study reports data from waves two and three. Setting: Participants were recruited from the electoral roll in the Australian Capital Territory and Queanbeyan, New South Wales, Australia. Participants: Participants were aged 20-24 years at wave one (1999-2000). Measures: The study collected self-reported data on ecstasy, meth/amphetamine, cannabis, alcohol, tobacco and use of sleeping medications (pharmaceutical or other substances). Depression was categorised with the Brief Patient Health Questionnaire (BPHQ). Other psychosocial measures included lifetime traumas. We used generalised estimating equations to model outcomes. Results: Ecstasy data were available from 2128 people at wave two and 1977 at wave three: sleeping medication use was reported by 227 (10.7%) respondents at wave two and 239 (12.1%) at wave three. Increased odds ratios (OR) for sleeping medication use was found for those with depression (OR=1.88, (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.39, 2.53), women (OR=1.44, 95% CI 1.13, 1.84), and increased by 19% for each lifetime trauma. Ecstasy use was not a significant predictor, but >monthly versus never meth/amphetamine use increased the odds (OR=3.03, 95% CI 1.30, 7.03). Conclusion: The use of ecstasy was not associated with the use of sleeping medications controlling for other risk factors.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe PATH study was supported by an NHMRC Program Grant 179805 and NHMRC Project Grant 157125. The sponsors had no role in the design, conduct or reporting of the research. None of the authors have connections (direct or indirect) with the tobacco, alcohol, pharmaceutical or gaming industries or any body substantially funded by one of these organisations.
dc.format9 pages
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.rightshttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0965-2140/ Sherpa/Romeo as at 6/1/14: author can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing).
dc.sourceAddiction 108.9 (2013): 1640-1648
dc.subjectlongitudinal
dc.subjectcohort
dc.subjectecstasy
dc.subject3,4-methylenedioxymethamhetamine (MDMA)
dc.subjectmeth/amphetamine
dc.subjectgeneral community sample
dc.title‘Ecstasy’ and the use of sleep medications in a general community sample: a four-year follow-up
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume108
dc.date.issued2013-05
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4056230xPUB270
local.publisher.urlhttp://au.wiley.com/WileyCDA/
local.type.statusSubmitted Version
local.contributor.affiliationTait, Robert, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGeorge, Amanda, University of Canberra
local.contributor.affiliationOlesen, Sarah, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/179805
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/157125
local.bibliographicCitation.issue9
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1640
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1648
local.identifier.doi10.1111/add.12200
local.identifier.absseo920410 - Mental Health
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T09:20:39Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84882275662
local.identifier.thomsonID000323160500022
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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