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The cession of Sarawak to the British Crown in 1946

Reece, Bob H. W.

Description

The cession of Sarawak by the third Rajah to the British Crown finally resolved the ambiguous position of a European-ruled Malay state which remained within the British imperial system for 100 years without being a formal part of it. External pressures, principally the Japanese invasion, had made direct British control both necessary and irresistible. The problem of the succession also helped to ensure that the Rajah’s agreement was not difficult to obtain. But it was already apparent in...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorReece, Bob H. W.
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-28T23:20:39Z
dc.date.available2016-11-28T23:20:39Z
dc.date.copyright1977
dc.identifier.otherb1292626
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/110697
dc.description.abstractThe cession of Sarawak by the third Rajah to the British Crown finally resolved the ambiguous position of a European-ruled Malay state which remained within the British imperial system for 100 years without being a formal part of it. External pressures, principally the Japanese invasion, had made direct British control both necessary and irresistible. The problem of the succession also helped to ensure that the Rajah’s agreement was not difficult to obtain. But it was already apparent in the 1930s that Brooke rule had come to the end of the road and could only look backwards. The Brooke administration’s failure to re-define native interests in the light of economic and social developments had removed the rationale upon which the Raj was avowedly based. The legitimization of cession was a grubby affair undertaken more for the benefit of British domestic opinion than the people of Sarawak. Nevertheless, it provided an issue which fostered the political development of Sarawak from a loose group of communities linked only by a common acceptance of the Rajah’s authority to a multi-racial state with its own nationalist tradition. Sarawak nationalism took the form of a movement to restore Brooke rule but it envisaged the establishment of an independent native state in which power would be shared between the Malays and the Ibans.
dc.format.extent1 v
dc.language.isoen
dc.subject.lcshBritish Malaysia Malaya
dc.subject.lcshSarawak History
dc.titleThe cession of Sarawak to the British Crown in 1946
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorReid, A.J.S.
local.contributor.supervisorStenson, Michael
dcterms.valid1977
local.description.notesThis thesis has been made available through exception 200AB to the Copyright Act.
local.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.issued1977
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d763693a53fb
dc.date.updated2016-11-25T00:03:05Z
local.identifier.proquestYes
local.mintdoimint
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