Nathadwara, the image of Shri Nathiji, with priest (Private Collection)

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Photographer: Arthur Llewellyn Basham

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Even in the nineteenth century, Mughal characteristics lingered on in isolated works. The Mughal tradition is evident here in the cool, pale colours, the delicacy of line, and the naturalistic detail. After the great mutiny of 1857, the last Mughal emperor was exiled to Burma, and rajas who had not loyally supported the British cause were punished. The faltering tradition of the Indian miniature received a last burst of vitality from the introduction of aniline colours
during the third quarter of the nineteenth century, traditional artists painted the bluest of Krishnas dancing with Gopis in landscapes greener than any grass. But soon Rajput princes began to admire the arts they saw in the homes of the British overlords, and gradually miniatures in Rajput halls were replaced by oil paintings, photographs, and chromolithographs.

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Miniature Painting, Rajasthan: General, paintings, miniatures, slide set

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This item is provided for research purposes. Contact the Australian National University Archives at butlin.archives@anu.edu.au for permission to use.

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