When tax collectors become collectors for child support and student loans: jeopardizing the revenue base?

Date

2004

Authors

Ahmed, Eliza
Braithwaite, Valerie

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Helbing & Lichtenhahn Verlag

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationship between making additional payments to the state for student loan (via the Higher Education Contribution Scheme) and child support (via the Child Support Scheme) and compliance with tax law. Data are taken from the Community Hopes, Fears, and Actions Survey based on a random sample of 2040 individuals. Additional payments were found to pose a compliance problem for tax authorities. At the same time, this study demonstrated that perceived deterrence, moral obligation and possible trustworthiness play significant roles in reducing tax evasion. An important finding to emerge from this study is that tax evasion is more likely to accompany additional payments when personal income and belief in trust norms are low. The finding of greater tax evasion among economically marginalized groups has been demonstrated in other contexts, but the adverse effects of becoming irreconcilably socially marginalized from legal authority has tended to be both undervalued and under-theorized in the taxation compliance literature.

Description

Keywords

additional payments, social policy, debt collection, government policy, child support, higher education, voluntary tax paying culture, compliance, tax system, tax evasion, tax collectors

Citation

Source

Kyklos, 3, 303-326. (2004)

Type

Journal article

Book Title

Entity type

Access Statement

Open Access

License Rights

DOI

10.1111/j.0023-5962.2004.00256.x

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