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An air-based corrugated cavity-receiver for solar parabolic trough concentrators

Bader, Roman; Pedretti , Andrea; Barbato, Maurizio; Steinfeld, Aldo

Description

A tubular cavity-receiver that uses air as the heat transfer fluid is evaluated numerically using a validated heat transfer model. The receiver is designed for use on a large-span (9 m net concentrator aperture width) solar parabolic trough concentrator. Through the combination of a parabolic primary concentrator with a nonimaging secondary concentrator, the collector reaches a solar concentration ratio of 97.5. Four different receiver configurations are considered, with smooth or V-corrugated...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBader, Roman
dc.contributor.authorPedretti , Andrea
dc.contributor.authorBarbato, Maurizio
dc.contributor.authorSteinfeld, Aldo
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-24T22:42:09Z
dc.identifier.issn0306-2619
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/98960
dc.description.abstractA tubular cavity-receiver that uses air as the heat transfer fluid is evaluated numerically using a validated heat transfer model. The receiver is designed for use on a large-span (9 m net concentrator aperture width) solar parabolic trough concentrator. Through the combination of a parabolic primary concentrator with a nonimaging secondary concentrator, the collector reaches a solar concentration ratio of 97.5. Four different receiver configurations are considered, with smooth or V-corrugated absorber tube and single or double-glazed aperture window. The collector’s performance is characterized by its optical efficiency and heat loss. The optical efficiency is determined with the Monte Carlo ray-tracing method. Radiative heat exchange inside the receiver is calculated with the net radiation method. The 2D steady-state energy equation, which couples conductive, convective, and radiative heat transfer, is solved for the solid domains of the receiver cross-section, using finite-volume techniques. Simulations for Sevilla/Spain at the summer solstice at solar noon (direct normal solar irradiance: 847 W m2 , solar incidence angle: 13.9) yield collector efficiencies between 60% and 65% at a heat transfer fluid temperature of 125 C and between 37% and 42% at 500 C, depending on the receiver configuration. The optical losses amount to more than 30% of the incident solar radiation and constitute the largest source of energy loss. For a 200 m long collector module operated between 300 and 500 C, the isentropic pumping power required to pump the HTF through the receiver is between 11 and 17 kW.
dc.publisherPergamon Press
dc.sourceApplied Energy
dc.titleAn air-based corrugated cavity-receiver for solar parabolic trough concentrators
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume138
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor091305 - Energy Generation, Conversion and Storage Engineering
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5117155xPUB46
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBader, Roman, College of Engineering and Computer Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationPedretti , Andrea, ETH Zurich
local.contributor.affiliationBarbato, Maurizio, Via Croce
local.contributor.affiliationSteinfeld, Aldo, ETH Zurich
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage337
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage345
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.apenergy.2014.10.050
local.identifier.absseo850505 - Solar-Thermal Electric Energy
local.identifier.absseo850506 - Solar-Thermal Energy
dc.date.updated2016-06-14T09:11:48Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84920067561
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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