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Extreme weather events and climate change concern

Konisky, David; Hughes, Llewelyn; Kaylor, Charles

Description

This paper examines whether experience of extreme weather events—such as excessive heat, droughts, flooding, and hurricanes—increases an individual’s level concern about climate change. We bring together micro level geospatial data on extreme weather events from NOAA’s Storm Events Database with public opinion data from multiple years of the Cooperative Congressional Election Study to study this question. We find evidence of a modest, but discernible positive relationship between experiencing...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorKonisky, David
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Llewelyn
dc.contributor.authorKaylor, Charles
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-24T22:41:51Z
dc.identifier.issn0165-0009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/98835
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines whether experience of extreme weather events—such as excessive heat, droughts, flooding, and hurricanes—increases an individual’s level concern about climate change. We bring together micro level geospatial data on extreme weather events from NOAA’s Storm Events Database with public opinion data from multiple years of the Cooperative Congressional Election Study to study this question. We find evidence of a modest, but discernible positive relationship between experiencing extreme weather activity and expressions of concern about climate change. However, the effect only materializes for recent extreme weather activity; activity that occurred over longer periods of time does not affect public opinion. These results are generally robust to various measurement strategies and model specifications. Our findings contribute to the public opinion literature on the importance of local environmental conditions on attitude formation.
dc.publisherKluwer Academic Publishers
dc.sourceClimatic Change
dc.titleExtreme weather events and climate change concern
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolumeOnline Early Version
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor160603 - Comparative Government and Politics
local.identifier.absfor160605 - Environmental Politics
local.identifier.absfor160607 - International Relations
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB8233
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationKonisky, David, Indiana University
local.contributor.affiliationHughes, Llewelyn, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKaylor, Charles, Temple University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2015
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage15
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s10584-015-1555-3
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:15:27Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84948672317
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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