Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Eucalyptus viminalis dieback in the Monaro region, NSW

Ross, Catherine; Brack, Cristopher

Description

Over the last decade, substantial numbers of Eucalyptus viminalis across the Monaro plains in south-eastern NSW have been observed as declining in health. Based on a systematic road survey, the affected area is estimated to cover around 2000 km2, with almost all E. viminalis within that area either dead or severely affected. Other eucalypt species present show minor levels of health deterioration. Field observations include widespread infestation of an endemic but previously undescribed species...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorRoss, Catherine
dc.contributor.authorBrack, Cristopher
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-24T22:41:51Z
dc.identifier.issn0004-9158
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/98830
dc.description.abstractOver the last decade, substantial numbers of Eucalyptus viminalis across the Monaro plains in south-eastern NSW have been observed as declining in health. Based on a systematic road survey, the affected area is estimated to cover around 2000 km2, with almost all E. viminalis within that area either dead or severely affected. Other eucalypt species present show minor levels of health deterioration. Field observations include widespread infestation of an endemic but previously undescribed species of eucalyptus weevil (Gonipterus sp.). Eight sites were chosen to represent the range of management practices and recent fire history in the affected area. The structural complexity, tree health and level of weevil infestation were determined at each site, and despite large differences in structural elements and overall complexity, the severity of dieback was consistently severe across the range. There does not appear to be sufficient evidence to conclude that changed land management practices, recent fire history or declining levels of structural complexity are responsible for this ‘Monaro dieback’. If the dieback continues at the current rate, it seems inevitable that E. viminalis will disappear entirely from the Monaro region. As E. viminalis is the dominant species in most of the region, such disappearance will have very serious consequences on the ecology of the region. Further work is required to determine if the dieback is related to changes in climate or rainfall patterns. Trials of potential replacement E. viminalis genotypes and alternative eucalypt species should be undertaken as a precaution in case the dieback cannot be reversed.
dc.publisherInstitute of Foresters of Australia
dc.sourceAustralian Forestry
dc.titleEucalyptus viminalis dieback in the Monaro region, NSW
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume78
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor070500 - FORESTRY SCIENCES
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB7704
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationRoss, Catherine, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBrack, Cristopher, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage243
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage253
local.identifier.doi10.1080/00049158.2015.1076754
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:15:23Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84948098834
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Ross_Eucalyptus_viminalis_dieback_2015.pdf1.43 MBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator