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The new land grab in Papua New Guinea: case study from New Ireland Province

CollectionsANU Dept. of Pacific Affairs (DPA) formerly State, Society and Governance in Melanesia (SSGM) Program
Title: The new land grab in Papua New Guinea: case study from New Ireland Province
Author(s): Filer, Colin
Keywords: livelihoods
governance
Papua New Guinea
Date published: 2011
Publisher: Canberra, ACT: State, Society and Governance in Melanesia (SSGM) Program, School of International, Political and Strategic Studies, College of Asia & the Pacific, The Australian National University
Citation: Filer, C. (2011). The new land grab in Papua New Guinea: Case study from New Ireland Province. SSGM Discussion Paper 2011/2. Canberra, ACT: ANU College of Asia & the Pacific, School of International, Political and Strategic Studies, State, Society and Governance in Melanesia Program
Series/Report no.: Discussion Paper (The Australian National University, State, Society and Governance in Melanesia (SSGM) Program): 2011/2
Description: 
"In this paper, I explain this episode [whole island of New Hanover (or Lavongai) was sold by a company called Tutuman Development Ltd (TDL) to a Singaporean company called Palma Hacienda Ltd] by reference to what I call the “new land grab” in PNG. I have already presented a general account of this phenomenon, along with case studies from Central and East New Britain provinces, in another publication (Filer 2011). A more detailed account of the way that customary land has recently been “grabbed” in New Ireland Province is partly warranted by public interest in the episode I have just recounted, and also by the fact that New Ireland is one of the provinces where this activity is both well entrenched and reasonably well documented. An examination of land grabbing in New Ireland can therefore help us to answer two of the key questions that have arisen in broader national debate about the land grab. The first is whether and why some customary landowners might have consented to the expropriation of their own land; the second is whether the formal unity of the legal process through which their land has been expropriated conceals a variety of motives and outcomes on the part of the actors who either support or oppose this process .. " - page 1
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/9879
ISSN: 1328-7854

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