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Resilience, stressful life events, and depressive symptomatology among older Chinese adults

Lim, May Li; Lim, Donovan; Gwee, Xinyi; Nyunt, Ma Shwe Zin; Kumar, Rajeev; Pin Ng, Tze

Description

Objective: The association between exposure to stressful life events (SLEs) and late-life depression is well-documented. However, the role of resilience as a buffer against the adverse mental health effects of SLEs in late life has not been convincingly demonstrated. In this paper, the moderating effect of resilience in the relationship between SLEs and depressive symptomatology in older Chinese adults is investigated. Method: A population sample of 385 community-dwelling older Chinese adults...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLim, May Li
dc.contributor.authorLim, Donovan
dc.contributor.authorGwee, Xinyi
dc.contributor.authorNyunt, Ma Shwe Zin
dc.contributor.authorKumar, Rajeev
dc.contributor.authorPin Ng, Tze
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-24T22:41:42Z
dc.identifier.issn1360-7863
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/98785
dc.description.abstractObjective: The association between exposure to stressful life events (SLEs) and late-life depression is well-documented. However, the role of resilience as a buffer against the adverse mental health effects of SLEs in late life has not been convincingly demonstrated. In this paper, the moderating effect of resilience in the relationship between SLEs and depressive symptomatology in older Chinese adults is investigated. Method: A population sample of 385 community-dwelling older Chinese adults aged ≥60 years responded to questionnaires on resilience (Connor–Davidson resilience scale), depressive symptomatology (Geriatric Depression Scale, GDS-15) and SLEs. Results: Increased numbers of SLEs (β = 0.343, p < .001) and lower levels of resilience (β = –0.137, p < 0.001) were significantly associated with higher levels of depressive symptomatology. There was a significant interaction of resilience and number of SLEs on depressive symptomatology (p = 0.003). The sense of personal competence and optimism was the principal underlying resilience dimension moderating the relationship for both the young–old (aged 60–69) and the old–old (aged 70 and above). Conclusion: The finding of significant interaction supported the role of resilience in moderating the adverse effect of SLEs in terms of depressive symptoms among older Chinese adults.
dc.publisherCarfax Publishing, Taylor & Francis Group
dc.sourceAging and Mental Health
dc.titleResilience, stressful life events, and depressive symptomatology among older Chinese adults
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume19
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor110000 - MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB7569
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLim, May Li, National University of Singapore
local.contributor.affiliationLim, Donovan, Psychological & Addiction Medicine
local.contributor.affiliationGwee, Xinyi, National University of Singapore
local.contributor.affiliationNyunt, Ma Shwe Zin, National University Hospital
local.contributor.affiliationKumar, Rajeev, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationPin Ng, Tze, National University Hospital Singapore
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue11
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1005
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1014
local.identifier.doi10.1080/13607863.2014.995591
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:14:25Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84938999908
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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