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Whose business is it to employ Indigenous workers?

Hunter, Boyd

Description

Research about the demand for Indigenous labour and the relationship of Indigenous workers to their employers is relatively scarce. Even less is known about Indigenous businesses. Supply Nation defines an Indigenous business as those where Indigenous stakeholders hold majority equity, but some researchers have argued that this definition could be relaxed to include businesses in which Indigenous people hold only half the equity in the enterprise. This article uses data from the Industry...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHunter, Boyd
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-24T22:41:31Z
dc.identifier.issn1035-3046
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/98716
dc.description.abstractResearch about the demand for Indigenous labour and the relationship of Indigenous workers to their employers is relatively scarce. Even less is known about Indigenous businesses. Supply Nation defines an Indigenous business as those where Indigenous stakeholders hold majority equity, but some researchers have argued that this definition could be relaxed to include businesses in which Indigenous people hold only half the equity in the enterprise. This article uses data from the Industry Capability Network Queensland, which has collected basic business information on a large number of businesses operating in Queensland. The findings reveal that Indigenous businesses have substantially better outcomes for Indigenous employment than non-Indigenous businesses - a result that holds even when the definition of Indigenous business is relaxed. The article also documents how Indigenous employment is concentrated in larger businesses, in particular industry sectors. Non-Indigenous micro-businesses employ relatively few Indigenous workers, and future research can usefully explore why this is the case. To understand the issues involved, it will be necessary to collect multi-level data that link detailed information on employers and employees (including a substantial sample of Indigenous workers).
dc.publisherUniversity of New South Wales
dc.sourceEconomic and Labour Relations Review
dc.titleWhose business is it to employ Indigenous workers?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume26
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor140211 - Labour Economics
local.identifier.absfor169902 - Studies of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Society
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB6856
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHunter, Boyd, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage631
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage651
local.identifier.doi10.1177/1035304615598526
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:12:26Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84948395956
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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