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MAPPING the SHORES of the BROWN DWARF DESERT. IV. OPHIUCHUS

Cheetham, Anthony; Kraus, A L; Cieza, Lucas A; Rizzuto, Aaron C.; Tuthill, Peter G; Ireland, Michael

Description

We conduct a multiplicity survey of members of the ρ Ophiuchus cloud complex with high-resolution imaging to characterize the multiple-star population of this nearby star-forming region and investigate the relation between stellar multiplicity and star and planet formation. Our aperture masking survey reveals the presence of five new stellar companions beyond the reach of previous studies, but does not result in the detection of any new substellar companions. We find that 43 ± 6% of the 114...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCheetham, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorKraus, A L
dc.contributor.authorCieza, Lucas A
dc.contributor.authorRizzuto, Aaron C.
dc.contributor.authorTuthill, Peter G
dc.contributor.authorIreland, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-24T22:41:28Z
dc.identifier.issn0004-637X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/98699
dc.description.abstractWe conduct a multiplicity survey of members of the ρ Ophiuchus cloud complex with high-resolution imaging to characterize the multiple-star population of this nearby star-forming region and investigate the relation between stellar multiplicity and star and planet formation. Our aperture masking survey reveals the presence of five new stellar companions beyond the reach of previous studies, but does not result in the detection of any new substellar companions. We find that 43 ± 6% of the 114 stars in our survey have stellar-mass companions between 1.3 and 780 AU, while 7+8 -5 % host brown dwarf companions in the same interval. By combining this information with knowledge of disk-hosting stars, we show that the presence of a close binary companion (separation <40 AU) significantly influences the lifetime of protoplanetary disks, a phenomenon previously seen in older star-forming regions. At the ∼1-2 Myr age of our Ophiuchus members ∼2/3 of close binary systems have lost their disks, compared to only ∼30% of single stars and wide binaries. This has a significant impact on the formation of giant planets, which are expected to require much longer than 1 Myr to form via core accretion and thus planets formed via this pathway should be rare in close binary systems.
dc.publisherIOP Publishing
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.sourceAstrophysical Journal, The
dc.titleMAPPING the SHORES of the BROWN DWARF DESERT. IV. OPHIUCHUS
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume813
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor020102 - Astronomical and Space Instrumentation
local.identifier.absfor020104 - Galactic Astronomy
local.identifier.absfor020110 - Stellar Astronomy and Planetary Systems
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB6829
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationCheetham, Anthony, University of Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationKraus, A L, The University of Texas
local.contributor.affiliationIreland, Michael, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCieza, Lucas A, University of Hawaii
local.contributor.affiliationRizzuto, Aaron C., University of Texas at Austin
local.contributor.affiliationTuthill, Peter G, University of Sydney
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage12
local.identifier.doi10.1088/0004-637X/813/2/83
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:12:11Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84947936929
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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