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Identity and culturally-defined methods of adaptation among the Wadandi people of southwestern Australia

Guilfoyle, David R; Mitchell, Myles; Webb, Wayne

Description

This paper examines the relationship between social identity and ‘culturally defined methods of adaptation’ (CDMA) to change. Based on a case study of the Wadandi people of southwestern Australia, the spatial analysis of pre- and postcolonial settlement patterns is examined and integrated with oral histories. The purpose is to understand and document the strategies employed by the Wadandi people to maintain independence and cultural vitality in the face of massive social and economic upheaval...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGuilfoyle, David R
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Myles
dc.contributor.authorWebb, Wayne
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-24T22:40:45Z
dc.identifier.isbn9783319096889
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/98429
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the relationship between social identity and ‘culturally defined methods of adaptation’ (CDMA) to change. Based on a case study of the Wadandi people of southwestern Australia, the spatial analysis of pre- and postcolonial settlement patterns is examined and integrated with oral histories. The purpose is to understand and document the strategies employed by the Wadandi people to maintain independence and cultural vitality in the face of massive social and economic upheaval associated with intensive colonialism. This paper argues that understanding these strategies is central to understanding both the pre- and post-contact cultural landscape and the associated range of heritage values that includes a central concept of identity. More so, the very process of engaging with archaeologists in this way, it is argued, represents another form of controlling and protecting the heritage process in a manner that strips away at the inherent colonial tendencies of the discipline itself. At a practical level, the process allows archaeologists to incorporate aspects of identity and CDMA, that simultaneously allows for the constant articulation of identity during the assessment process, and ultimately the development of more holistic significance assessments for greater protection of places and the associated values.
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.relation.ispartofIdentity and Heritage: Contemporary Challenges in a Globalized World
dc.relation.isversionof1st Edition
dc.titleIdentity and culturally-defined methods of adaptation among the Wadandi people of southwestern Australia
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor210101 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Archaeology
local.identifier.absfor160101 - Anthropology of Development
local.identifier.ariespublicationu1015647xPUB20
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationGuilfoyle, David R, Western Australian Museum
local.contributor.affiliationMitchell, Myles, Other Non-College Academic, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWebb, Wayne, Centre of Excellence in Natural Resource Management
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage85
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage96
local.identifier.absseo950302 - Conserving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage
local.identifier.absseo950503 - Understanding Australia's Past
local.identifier.absseo950304 - Conserving Intangible Cultural Heritage
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:50:31Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationCham
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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