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Introduction: the expanded conception of security and institutions

Nasu, Hitoshi; Rubenstein, Kim

Description

Security is a dynamic, context-dependent concept that is inevitably shaped by social conditions and practices. The socio-political perception of security threats influences our security policies relevant to political decisions about the design of social institutions specifically addressing those security concerns. Security is traditionally understood to be physical protection of national territory and its population from the destructive effects of warfare through military means. Social...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorNasu, Hitoshi
dc.contributor.authorRubenstein, Kim
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-24T22:40:44Z
dc.identifier.isbn9781107102781
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/98424
dc.description.abstractSecurity is a dynamic, context-dependent concept that is inevitably shaped by social conditions and practices. The socio-political perception of security threats influences our security policies relevant to political decisions about the design of social institutions specifically addressing those security concerns. Security is traditionally understood to be physical protection of national territory and its population from the destructive effects of warfare through military means. Social institutions including but not limited to national governing institutions, inter-governmental institutions and the military are all devices developed through human history to collectively address traditional security threats. Security is often considered to be an antithesis of the rule of law and civil liberty, justifying violation of rules and the restriction of freedom. However, the development of international law and the institutionalisation of international public authorities have contributed to the increased normalcy or containment of extra-legal responses to security threats. For example, the Charter of the United Nations (‘UN Charter’) provides institutionalised mechanisms as the means of regulating the behaviour of sovereign states and conflict among them. The nuclear non-proliferation regime establishes mechanisms for preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons and facilitating the development of peaceful nuclear energy technology by institutionalising the asymmetric obligations between designated nuclear-weapon states and other non-nuclear-weapon states.
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.relation.ispartofLegal Perspectives on Security Institutions
dc.relation.isversionof1st Edition
dc.titleIntroduction: the expanded conception of security and institutions
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor180116 - International Law (excl. International Trade Law)
local.identifier.ariespublicationu1015647xPUB12
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationNasu, Hitoshi, ANU College of Law, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRubenstein, Kim, ANU College of Law, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage24
local.identifier.doi10.1017/CBO9781316212677.003
local.identifier.absseo940303 - International Organisations
local.identifier.absseo970118 - Expanding Knowledge in Law and Legal Studies
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:50:11Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationCambridge, United Kingdom
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84954306277
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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