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Recent challenges to nation-building in Kanaky New Caledonia

CollectionsANU Dept. of Pacific Affairs (DPA) formerly State, Society and Governance in Melanesia (SSGM) Program
Title: Recent challenges to nation-building in Kanaky New Caledonia
Author(s): Chappell, David
Date published: 2013
Publisher: Canberra, ACT: State, Society and Governance in Melanesia (SSGM) Program, School of International, Political and Strategic Studies, College of Asia & the Pacific, The Australian National University
Citation: Chappell, D. (2013). Recent challenges to nation-building in Kanaky New Caledonia. SSGM Discussion Paper 2013/1. Canberra, ACT: ANU College of Asia & the Pacific, School of International, Political and Strategic Studies, State, Society and Governance in Melanesia Program
Series/Report no.: Discussion Paper (The Australian National University, State, Society and Governance in Melanesia (SSGM) Program): 2013/1
Description: 
"After significant decolonisation in the 1950s, New Caledonia’s destiny was reversed in the 1960s for reasons of French national prestige and strategic nickel resources. The lesson of the 1980s is that regression was a mistake. Today, everyone in the restricted New Caledonian citizenship of longterm residents has accepted self-government; they differ over the degree of separation from France, that is, the specific details of sovereignty. The exact legal boundary between enlarged autonomy and full sovereignty, especially in a globalising world that compromises even French independence (for example, the European Union, or multinational corporations), has yet to be determined. In March 2011, at a colloquium in Noumea that presented comparative perspectives on decolonisation, legal scholars suggested that so-called ‘reserved’ powers — which loyalists want France to keep — such as defense and public order, are not carved in stone in French law. Instead, they constitute bundles of administrative responsibilities, some of which are already shared, so the exact category of the country’s future status may be less important than the principles that local leaders bring to the negotiating table and find consensual ways to implement ..." - page 9
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/9840
ISSN: 1328-7854

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