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From self sufficiency to dependence: Mechanisms and factors important for autotransporter biogenesis

Leyton, Denisse; Rossiter, Amanda E.; Henderson, Ian R

Description

Autotransporters are a superfamily of proteins that use the type V secretion pathway for their delivery to the surface of Gram-negative bacteria. At first glance, autotransporters look to contain all the functional elements required to promote their own secretion: an amino-terminal signal peptide to mediate translocation across the inner membrane, a central passenger domain that is the secreted functional moiety, and a channel-forming carboxyl terminus that facilitates passenger domain...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLeyton, Denisse
dc.contributor.authorRossiter, Amanda E.
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, Ian R
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-24T22:40:26Z
dc.identifier.issn1740-1526
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/98327
dc.description.abstractAutotransporters are a superfamily of proteins that use the type V secretion pathway for their delivery to the surface of Gram-negative bacteria. At first glance, autotransporters look to contain all the functional elements required to promote their own secretion: an amino-terminal signal peptide to mediate translocation across the inner membrane, a central passenger domain that is the secreted functional moiety, and a channel-forming carboxyl terminus that facilitates passenger domain translocation across the outer membrane. However, recent discoveries of common structural themes, translocation intermediates and accessory interactions have challenged the perceived simplicity of autotransporter secretion. Here, we discuss how these studies have led to an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for autotransporter biogenesis.
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.sourceNature Reviews Microbiology
dc.subjectKeywords: carrier protein; outer membrane protein; signal peptide; amino terminal sequence; biogenesis; carboxy terminal sequence; cellular distribution; Gram negative bacterium; nonhuman; outer membrane; priority journal; protein domain; protein structure; protein
dc.titleFrom self sufficiency to dependence: Mechanisms and factors important for autotransporter biogenesis
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume10
dc.date.issued2012
local.identifier.absfor060501 - Bacteriology
local.identifier.absfor060112 - Structural Biology (incl. Macromolecular Modelling)
local.identifier.absfor060110 - Receptors and Membrane Biology
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB1526
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLeyton, Denisse, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRossiter, Amanda E., University of Brimingham
local.contributor.affiliationHenderson, Ian R, University of Birmingham
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage213
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage225
local.identifier.doi10.1038/nrmicro2733
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:05:33Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84857148914
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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