Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Accounting for health in climate change policies: a case study of Fiji

Morrow, Georgina; Bowen, Kathryn

Description

BACKGROUND Climate change is expected to affect the health of most populations in the coming decades, having the greatest impact on the poorest and most disadvantaged people in the world. The Pacific islands, including Fiji, are particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. OBJECTIVE The three major health impacts of climate change in Fiji explored in this study were dengue fever, diarrhoeal disease, and malnutrition, as they each pose a significant threat to human health. The aim...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMorrow, Georgina
dc.contributor.authorBowen, Kathryn
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T00:26:28Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T00:26:28Z
dc.identifier.issn1654-9716
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/97948
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND Climate change is expected to affect the health of most populations in the coming decades, having the greatest impact on the poorest and most disadvantaged people in the world. The Pacific islands, including Fiji, are particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. OBJECTIVE The three major health impacts of climate change in Fiji explored in this study were dengue fever, diarrhoeal disease, and malnutrition, as they each pose a significant threat to human health. The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent the Fiji National Climate Change Policy, and a selection of relevant sectoral policies, account for these human health effects of climate change. DESIGN The study employed a three-pronged policy analysis to evaluate: 1) the content of the Fijian National Climate Change Policy and to what extent health was incorporated within this; 2) the context within which the policy was developed; 3) the relevant processes; and 4) the actors involved. A selection of relevant sectoral policies were also analysed to assess the extent to which these included climate change and health considerations. RESULTS The policy analysis showed that these three health impacts of climate change were only considered to a minor extent, and often indirectly, in both the Fiji National Climate Change Policy and the corresponding National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, as well as the Public Health Act. Furthermore, supporting documents in relevant sectors including water and agriculture made no mention of climate change and health impacts. CONCLUSIONS The projected health impacts of climate change should be considered as part of reviewing the Fiji National Climate Change Policy and National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, and the Public Health Act. In the interest of public health, this should include strategies for combating dengue fever, malnutrition, and water-borne disease. Related sectoral policies in water and agriculture should also be revised to consider climate change and its impact on human health. Approaches to include health aspects of climate change within sectoral and climate change specific policies should be encouraged, via a number of mechanisms, such as the Health in All Policies approach. Future research could support the Fiji health sector in developing climate change and health programmes.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was partly funded by Rotary International through an Ambassadorial Scholarship awarded to Georgina Morrow.
dc.format11 pages
dc.publisherCo-Action Publishing
dc.rights© 2014 Georgina Morrow and Kathryn Bowen. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons CC-BY 4.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and to remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially, provided the original work is properly cited and states its license.
dc.sourceGlobal health action
dc.subjectfiji
dc.subjectclimate change
dc.subjecthealth
dc.subjectpacific islands
dc.subjectpolicy
dc.subjectpolicy analysis
dc.subjectdengue
dc.subjectdiarrhea
dc.subjecthealth policy
dc.subjecthumans
dc.subjectmalnutrition
dc.subjectpolicy making
dc.subjectwater supply
dc.subjectepidemiology
dc.subjectpublic policy
dc.titleAccounting for health in climate change policies: a case study of Fiji
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume7
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-04-15
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor111706
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB3972
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.co-action.net/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMorrow, Georgina, Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Germany
local.contributor.affiliationBowen, Kathryn, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, CMBE Research School of Population Health, Natl Centre for Epidemiology & Population Health, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1654-9880
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage23550
local.identifier.doi10.3402/gha.v7.23550
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:05:10Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84904363977
local.identifier.thomsonID000336455100001
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Morrow_Accounting_for_health_in_2014.pdfPublished Version222.68 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator